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Browser Redirect Virus/Trojan must be a new variant...


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I'm looking for the most current how-to guide as in as new as of September 22, 2011 on removing what apparently is the newest variant of the dirty Google Redirect Virus/Trojan that has eluded and absolutely baffled virus and spyware removal programmers for the past few weeks. I've tried multiple programs already to remove this infection which has deployed trojans that have been flagged as "Generic Artemis" by McAfee and .fsharproj was removed at one point. Searching Google doesn't give me the most current information on removing this plague.

Redirect locations that should be added as blacklisted - morsearch.com, bizzclick.com, find-answers-fast.com

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Hello crimefighter: :welcome:

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Does Malwarebytes currently detect what is described here (which was just posted online mere minutes ago...) --

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Internet-Explorer-Malware-Plugin-Infects-Firefox-223449.shtml

"Malware that sticks to a web browser is no news to anyone, but now, a new threat has been discovered that after infecting Internet Explorer, it drops a piece of spyware onto your Firefox.

With the aid of Bitdefender, MalwareCity identified the virus as being Trojan.Tracur.C. When Internet Explorer users decide to update their Flash Player, the rogue plug-in that compromises the browser also infects Mozilla Firefox by snapping a malicious add-on to it .

Trojan.JS.Redirector.KY monitors all the webpages loaded in Mozilla's browser. Once the unsuspecting internaut types the URL address of a search engine, such as Yahoo, Bing or Google, a piece of Java Script code gets injected into the resulting pages, making sure that the first link points to a malware containing location.

From here on, the infection process continues, victims being subjected to attacks coming from all sorts of threats.

According to Sophos, Trojan.Tracur.C affects Windows platforms and it runs automatically in an attempt to establish a communication channel with a remote server via HTTP. It changes Internet Explorer settings by creating registries such as HKCR\.fsharproj, HKCR\Zghypcxhle, HKCU\Software\Zghypcxhle, HKCU\Software\Classes\Software\Zghypcxhle.

Trojan.JS.Redirector viruses operate by launching an SQL injection attack that inserts JavaScript into the HTML pages they target.They can also be contained in HTML-based email messages which embed the script or malevolent websites which redirect the user to unwanted locations."

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After trying several different programs, which ended up being Microsoft Security Essentials being the last one and manual removal of the offending files and sending them here for analysis - it appears Tracur.AF has been defeated and a few more hidden items were found - java/openconnection.ou

Firewall is now set to paranoid mode as I'm not convinced Facebook is safe to use...this can be closed.

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