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18 Fun Interesting Facts You Never Knew About The Internet


ShyWriter
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My first introduction to the Internet was with Win95 and Netscape Navigator back in '94 with a 33.6kb dial up modem.

The Internet is still facinating to me.

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I remember browsing the Internet by command line only. Was quite slow and painful but it did work and was fascinating to me.

And operating from a BASH or C shell... Command-line FTPing.. PINE as one of the first email programs.. JOE as one of the first easy-to-use editors (especially compared to EIMACS).. LYNX as one of the first monocolor "link(s)" explorer.. No pictures.. Ahhhhh; remember when commercial use of the internet was prohibited?? No SPAM.. *shivers* of delight; the good-old-days...

"Feeling-even-older" ~Shy

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And operating from a BASH or C shell... Command-line FTPing.. PINE as one of the first email programs.. JOE as one of the first easy-to-use editors (especially compared to EIMACS).. LYNX as one of the first monocolor "link(s)" explorer.. No pictures.. Ahhhhh; remember when commercial use of the internet was prohibited?? No SPAM.. *shivers* of delight; the good-old-days...

"Feeling-even-older" ~Shy

now that brings back some memories... BSDI Unix, all of the O'Reilly "critter" books (awk/sed/etc), piles of Perl/C:/Unix scripting/etc. bibles.... fun times.

I rem the IBM PC showing up (Aug/81 I think) and I rem reading the IBM PC hardware/interface/timing spec manual and going wow, this is cool....

BBS days...upgrading from 300baud to 1200... wow, it would do almost a whole line at the time instead of individual char's.... my first USR HST modem, then USR Dual Standard...

as far as Intel based box, Ran Win 3.0 for 20 minutes and nuked it, 3.1 for 2 weeks and nuked it.... IBM OS/2 until IBM canned it. (IBM = dumb, OS/2 Warp was bulletproof)...

I feel old... I'll shutup now and drink my Geritol...

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first-browser.gif

As the page might have looked in LYNX; one of the first "browsers".

The other 16 facts can be read here starting at item 3. : http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/18-fun-interesting-facts-knew-internet/

Enjoy,

~Shy

How I love the green text. :blink: Still haven't figured out that Kaypro 2 I bought. :blink:

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as far as Intel based box, Ran Win 3.0 for 20 minutes and nuked it, 3.1 for 2 weeks and nuked it.... IBM OS/2 until IBM canned it. (IBM = dumb, OS/2 Warp was bulletproof)...

I feel old... I'll shutup now and drink my Geritol...

I feel your pain.

I had to use OS/2 Warp Communication Manager to set up those 300baud modems.

This will be familliar: :blink:

The Sound of dial-up Internet

post-100-1294492013_thumb.png

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How I love the green text. :blink: Still haven't figured out that Kaypro 2 I bought. :huh:

Except for the white on dark gray (black?) monitors of the mainframes, most early computers used green on black imaged monitors.. There was at least one "laptop" that had a plasma screen and used orange (reddish) on black writing. 40 column green on black sucked but when Apples were able to use a 80 column card, the text was quite readable.

I always wanted to get an Osborne, the OTHER 23.5 pound "portable.. :P But I would have settled for a Kaypro Ron.. and Buttons At that period iin time they were so cool.. ;)

~Steve..

@YK1: Speaking of 300 baud modems, I've been searching for years (yes I *am* persistant) for the actual, written statement by the Ma Bell engineer who said with all his 30 years of telephony experience, "Twisted copper pair phone lines would NEVER support more than a 300 baud signal. 300 baud was the ABSOLUTE limit!" I'd have loved to have seen the look on his face when he saw the 56K baud modem at work.. on twisted, copper pairs.. :blink:

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[...]

Ran Win 3.0 for 20 minutes and nuked it, 3.1 for 2 weeks and nuked it.... IBM OS/2 until IBM canned it. (IBM = dumb, OS/2 Warp was bulletproof)...

I feel old... I'll shutup now and drink my Geritol...

RE: Geritol; as the teacher always said, "Did you bring enough for the whole class?" :blink: I loved OS/2.. I can even remember using IBM as my ISP during the OS/2 days. And I did some beta testing for a few of the programs written for it by outsiders. It wasn't all IBM's fault - M$ was supposed to be writing the code for OS/2 but instead was spending most of their time writing Win3.0.

Breakup

"The collaboration between IBM and Microsoft unraveled in 1990, between the releases of Windows 3.0 and OS/2 1.3. During this time, Windows 3.0 became a tremendous success, selling millions of copies in its first year.[9] Much of its success was because Windows 3.0 (along with MS-DOS) was bundled with most new computers.[10] OS/2, on the other hand, was only available as an expensive stand-alone software package. In addition, OS/2 lacked device drivers for many common devices such as printers, particularly non-IBM hardware.[11] Windows, on the other hand, supported a much larger variety of hardware. The increasing popularity of Windows prompted Microsoft to shift its development focus from cooperating on OS/2 with IBM to building a franchise based on Windows" - Wikipedia

*sigh*

Thank God for memories.. :blink:

OS/2 is no longer marketed by IBM, and IBM standard support for OS/2 was discontinued on 31 December 2006. Currently, Serenity Systems sells OS/2 under the brand name eComStation.

~Shy

EDIT: Corrected URL for eComStation

Edited by ShyWriter
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@YK1: Speaking of 300 baud modems, I've been searching for years (yes I *am* persistant) for the actual, written statement by the Ma Bell engineer who said with all his 30 years of telephony experience, "Twisted copper pair phone lines would NEVER support more than a 300 baud signal. 300 baud was the ABSOLUTE limit!" I'd have loved to have seen the look on his face when he saw the 56K baud modem at work.. on twisted, copper pairs.. :blink:

Not many people know the difference between baud and bps.

With quadrature modulation you can send many more bits on a baud.

http://sattlers.org/mickey/tech/help/baud-v-bps.html

I worked with enginers that developed the 56K bps modem for IBM in Raleigh N.C. and Bill Gates got a hissy fit at that time with IBM for OS/2 so he decided to develop Windows further and as the saying goes The rest is history.

Who would have thought you can get 6MB on twisted, copper pairs with DSL. :blink:

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[...]

Who would have thought you can get 6MB on twisted, copper pairs with DSL. :blink:

Is DSL still distance sensitive in actual speed lessens the further away from a central station or was that just ADSL in the older days..

~Shy

EDIT: Changed spelling of acronym

Edited by ShyWriter
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Is DSL still distance sensitive in actual speed lessens the further away from a central station or was that just ASDL in the older days..

What is the Difference Between DSL and ADSL?

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-dsl-and-adsl.htm

Where is says

One downside to DSL is the proximity issue. The closer a subscriber lives to the phone company
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