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How many of these are necessary?


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I have just purchased the full version of Malwarebytes after trialling it for 2 months

and being impressed with its capabilities.

Now that I have the full version, I have decided to keep the programme in memory

so that I can have constant vigilance over the nasties of the universe.

However, I also run the following:

ESET Security Suite

SuperAntispyware (full version in memory)

ThreatFire (in memory)

Do I need t run them all together or will just Malwarebytes do the combined job

of SuperAntispyware and ThreatFire?

I like the ESET Suite for its simplicity and the fact that the ESET guys always deliver.

Any help would be appreciated and thank you for a great product.

zoomster

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zoomster, by running too many security applications it defeats the purpose as the security software conflicts with each other. In my opinion,

1. You need a good AntiVirus, ESET does a great job at this. Keep it.

2. You need to choose between ThreatFire, SUPERAntiSpyware, and Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware. Each of them serve the same purpose. It is your opinion as to which is better and should keep that one running constantly. As for the others, you should schedule scans every few days to make sure the others are not missing malware.

If anybody has any other opinions, feel free to post.

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Here's what I normally throw on peoples' computers:

* NOD32 AntiVirus (if they are willing to spring for a paid software)

* avast! 4 Home Free AntiVirus (which will probably change if they continue to go down-hill, as AntiVir is much better at the moment, and just as free)

* Comodo BOClean (real-time anti-spyware monitor with auto removal capabilities, not needed if you paid for MBAM)

* Malwarebytes' Anti Malware

* Spybot Search & Destroy (I prefer Malwarebytes' Anti Malware, but Spybot is also good)

Also, make sure to run StartUpLite just to minimise the amount of stuff running at startup. This will increase performance in a very good way.

For registry and computer tweaking, I like TuneUp Utilities. Doesn't bog your computer down like Registry Mechanic, and is a very good product (works on x64 versions of Windows as well).

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RD has hit the nail on the head so to speak as in regard to having to many real time protection applications running :).

The backup/registry application Cretemonster mentioned is a good piece of software, recently started using it myself :).

MMAM(protection enabled) used on a XP Home SP2 rig, no problems with the following:
  • AVG AV 7.5.516 Pro.
  • Comodo v3.0.18.309(D+ disabled).
  • SpywareGuard v2.2.0.
  • WinPatrol v14.0.2007.1:14.0.2007.1.

I also use the following:

  • SpywareBlaster
  • MVPS Hosts File
  • RogueRemover
  • Hardware firewall(Router Incorporated)
  • AVG Anti-Spyware(On-Demand only)
  • SuperAntispyware(On-Demand only)

It would also be advantageous to use a alternative browser such as FireFox or Opera.

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IThe router is the ultimate defense when properly configured,I have tested this in multi enviroments inviting as much trouble as possible,all to be killed at the router and lets just say I did get infected for instances,again,outgoing without my knowledge,blocked at the router.

I've never seen a router that can block spyware that installs through the browser. Granted there are devices that will do that, but I've never seen it in a router (and obviously it doesn't protect against unknown threats).

The point Dakeyras made about a more secure browser is just as important. Internet Explorer tends to be the most exploited piece of software in the world. Here's an interesting article by some guys who managed to chat with a malware author for some time, and the answers to the questions they asked: page 1 - page 2

If you want, I can always post info from Secunia on browser security.

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zoomster, by running too many security applications it defeats the purpose as the security software conflicts with each other. In my opinion,

1. You need a good AntiVirus, ESET does a great job at this. Keep it.

2. You need to choose between ThreatFire, SUPERAntiSpyware, and Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware. Each of them serve the same purpose. It is your opinion as to which is better and should keep that one running constantly. As for the others, you should schedule scans every few days to make sure the others are not missing malware.

If anybody has any other opinions, feel free to post.

Thanks for your constructive answers...still, the question was alluding to the fact that each

of these anti-malware programs have different ways of preempting attacks when resident

in memory. So, the question is still valid: do you need more than one program resident in memory

to save yourself from future attacks or having only one does the job very well as they all work the

same way...then, as you say, you can use them on demand to check for the nasties that

escaped. I am still a bit confused.

Best Regards to all

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I just installed Opera Browser,a first for me as Firefox has issues on certain machine setups here,any good or bad words about this browser?

I've been using Opera for 8 years. Even purchased a licence back when it was still a premium browser. It's always been my favorite, but there are things you need to know to make the most of it.

Firstly, Opera's Aspell integration sucks, so if you want spell check, then you need OSpell (site's not working at time of posting, so you may need to check back to see if my hosting service gets it fixed). Note that OSpell only works in webpages, and it's not real-time like MS-Word, but it's still better than nothing.

Secondly, User JavaScript is the single greatest tool that an Opera user has (with the possible exception of User CSS). It can affect webpages in many different ways, right down to mimicking the functionality of NoScript.

lastly, resources are everything. Things like OperaWatch, the Desktop Team Blog (which is where new builds are first announced, and where features and bugs are discussed), the My Opera Forums and community, OperaWiki, and random sites of fans like me that you will discover along the way (I don't keep a list of them). You may also want to check out this list.

Also, keep in mind that most of Opera is customizable to suit your style. You can change where the toolbars are to a certain degree (see this video), you can change what buttons are where, and you can create custom toolbar and menu setups by editing the INI files. You can also edit the shortcut keys to make them suit your style as well.

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