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MalwareBytes blocking all DLL's


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In the vast and intricate world of cybersecurity, Malwarebytes has long been heralded as a stalwart defender against malicious software. However, recent experiences have led me to ponder the fine line between vigilant protection and overzealous gatekeeping.

It all started on a seemingly ordinary Tuesday. I was working on a project that required a specific, well-regarded DLL file, known for its reliability and safety within the developer community. This DLL was the linchpin of my project, promising to streamline processes and enhance functionality without a hitch. Or so I thought.

Upon downloading and attempting to integrate this DLL into my project, I was met with an unexpected adversary: Malwarebytes. To my surprise and frustration, Malwarebytes flagged and blocked the DLL file, rendering it unusable. At first, I thought it was a simple mistake, a rare false positive in the world of cybersecurity tools. I proceeded to whitelist the file, assuming that would clear the path for my project's progression. But the saga was far from over.

Despite my efforts, Malwarebytes remained unyielding. Each attempt to use the DLL was met with resistance, as if the software had deemed all DLLs guilty by association. This relentless blockade was puzzling. The DLL in question had a pristine reputation, backed by countless successful integrations in other projects. Yet, here I was, caught in an unexpected standoff between my trusted cybersecurity tool and a crucial component of my project.

In a bid to resolve the issue, I dove into forums, scoured support articles, and even reached out to Malwarebytes' customer service. The consensus was clear: Malwarebytes had recently updated its heuristic analysis algorithms, resulting in a more aggressive stance towards DLLs, especially those downloaded from the internet, irrespective of their reputation.

This experience was a stark reminder of the delicate balance cybersecurity tools must maintain. On one hand, their vigilance protects us from genuine threats lurking in the digital shadows. On the other, overly aggressive protection can hinder productivity and innovation, trapping safe, essential files in the crossfire.

In the end, I had to temporarily disable Malwarebytes to use the DLL, a decision that was not taken lightly. The episode left me with a newfound appreciation for the complexities of cybersecurity and the challenges faced by software developers and security professionals alike. It also sparked a dialogue about the need for more nuanced protective measures that can differentiate between genuine threats and false alarms.

As I reflect on this ordeal, I can't help but wonder about the future of cybersecurity. How will tools like Malwarebytes evolve to strike a better balance? Only time will tell. For now, I tread cautiously, mindful of the invisible lines drawn by unseen guardians in the digital realm.

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1 hour ago, pancrab said:

In a bid to resolve the issue, I dove into forums, scoured support articles, and even reached out to Malwarebytes' customer service.

Not to cast doubt but there are dozens if not hundreds of posts on how to exclude files, folders, or processes from detection.

Exclude detections in Malwarebytes for Windows v4
https://support.malwarebytes.com/hc/en-us/articles/360038479234-Exclude-detections-in-Malwarebytes-for-Windows-v4

Had you contacted Malwarebytes Customer Support they 100% would have given you proper advice on how to prevent Malwarebytes from detecting

 

 

The consensus was clear: Malwarebytes had recently updated its heuristic analysis algorithms, resulting in a more aggressive stance towards DLLs, especially those downloaded from the internet, irrespective of their reputation.

Please show me posts or documentation on such. I'm not aware of any such change in stance on execuable file detection. Many many years ago we took a stance of adding more protection against PUP/PUM Possibly Unwanted Programs / Possibly Unwanted Modifications
https://forums.malwarebytes.com/topic/130207-pupoptional-listings-and-disputes/

Please attach the Protection Log showing the removal which will also include the HASH so that we can review the issue in more detail

 

 

This experience was a stark reminder of the delicate balance cybersecurity tools must maintain. On one hand, their vigilance protects us from genuine threats lurking in the digital shadows. On the other, overly aggressive protection can hinder productivity and innovation, trapping safe, essential files in the crossfire.

Again, it is very easy to exclude files from detection.

In Malwarebytes for Windows, there are four types of exclusions you can add:

  • File or folder
  • Website
  • Application that connects to the Internet
  • Previously detected exploit

 

 

In the end, I had to temporarily disable Malwarebytes to use the DLL, a decision that was not taken lightly. The episode left me with a newfound appreciation for the complexities of cybersecurity and the challenges faced by software developers and security professionals alike. It also sparked a dialogue about the need for more nuanced protective measures that can differentiate between genuine threats and false alarms.

I'm sorry but disabling Malwarebytes was not needed. Adding an exclusion would have allowed you to run the file in question good or bad. That is how all antivirus has worked now for well over thirty years.

 

As I reflect on this ordeal, I can't help but wonder about the future of cybersecurity. How will tools like Malwarebytes evolve to strike a better balance? Only time will tell. For now, I tread cautiously, mindful of the invisible lines drawn by unseen guardians in the digital realm.

Most people are quite thankful that Antivirus does block even if it is a false positive. It is better to be safe than sorry. The level of threats and attacks today are magnitudes higher with much more sophisticated attacks than there were many years ago.

 

 

Please see the replies above in the quote

 

 

The following information will help you to keep your computer and data safer as well as improve your overall privacy

  1. Recommend using a Password Manager for all websites, etc. that require a password. Never use the same password on more than one site.
    https://www.howtogeek.com/780233/best-password-manager/
  2. Make sure you're backing up your files https://forums.malwarebytes.com/topic/136226-backup-software/
  3. Keep all software up to date - PatchMyPC - https://patchmypc.com/home-updater#download     https://patchmypc.com/about-us
  4. Keep your Operating System up to date and current at all times - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-update-faq-8a903416-6f45-0718-f5c7-375e92dddeb2
  5. Further tips to help protect your computer data and improve your privacy: https://forums.malwarebytes.com/topic/258363-tips-to-help-protect-from-infection/ 
  6. Please consider installing the following Content Blockers for your Web browsers if you haven't done so already. This will help improve overall security

Malwarebytes Browser Guard

uBlock Origin

 

Cybersecurity basics & protection
Everything you need to know about cybercrime
https://www.malwarebytes.com/cybersecurity

 

Further reading if you'd like to keep up on the malware threat scene: Malwarebytes Blog  https://blog.malwarebytes.com/

 

Thank you for using Malwarebytes.

 

 

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