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Malwarebytes (or anything else) fails to detect propprethosnis messages


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For the past few weeks I have been getting propprethnosis pop-ups on my Mac mini M1 running Ventura 13.5 - problem started before I upgraded from Big Sur. 

Having read the article on  https://macsecurity.net/view/572-propprethosnis-pop-up-mac, I have tried the suggestions included to search manually for anything unusual (the article is not very helpful in its suggestions), clear cache, most cookies etc, downloaded and run Combo Cleaner, then also Malwarebytes and also tried SpyHunter. All scans have returned zero issues yet I frequently get the pop-ups and yesterday noticed that Safari (16.6) was locking quite frequently. I also use Brave (1.57.47) sometimes - I think I have seen the pop-up once but not certain. I prefer not use Google Chrome.

Any ideas how to resolve?

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MacSecurity is simply advertising for ComboCleaner. The profile tip is the only one that might solve your problem, but apparently you have already eliminated that. All the rest of the manual solutions are simply a compendium of almost every thing that has ever proven to solve a wide variety of malware issues and simply wasted your time.

Is the screenshot shown in the article exactly the webpage and popup you are seeing or is it more like this:

 

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@GS_Horwich

There is nothing to detect nor remove. This is what is called a FakeAlert as they are fraudulently alerting you to a state, condition or event that does not exist.  In this case they are masquerading as McAfee. As a web page it exists on the 'net and can be blocked.  These web pages are a type of Malicious Advertisement (aka; malvertisement).  Malwarebytes Browser Guard is good at dynamically blocking such content.  The Malwarebytes Anti Malware Software will need to know the URL of the site hosting the malvertising  content to block. 

Below are examples of McAfee FakeAlets I have personally experienced.  Each ScreenShot shows the fully qualified URL of the site producing the content.  Since these FakeAlerts exist as a malvertisement on web pages, software can not "remove" them.  As web sites they can be blocked.

https://www.malwarebytes.com/browserguard

McAfee1.thumb.jpg.6afef0090515b67ad7f01a2dbfb6af25.jpg

McAfee4.jpg.99eeb78b6cc88212c60062d32f952b88.jpg

McAfee6.thumb.jpg.88bbc212f226b1d3527c9ce8040c40bb.jpg

Edited by David H. Lipman
Edited for content, clarity, spelling and/or grammar
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Are you talking about Browser based Push Notification

If yes...

Please reference the below Malwarebytes Labs article on Browser Push Notifications.
Look for the section "How do I disable them?"
Browser push notifications: a feature asking to be abused

Google Chrome:
Turn notifications on or off - Google Chrome

Mozilla Firefox:
Web Push notifications in Firefox

Microsoft Edge:
Manage website notifications in Microsoft Edge

Apple Safari
Customize website notifications in Safari on Mac

 

Edited by David H. Lipman
Edited for content, clarity, spelling and/or grammar
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No, thank you @sp123

My link was fixed.

BBCode syntax error on my part

[URL=]https://support.apple.com/guide/safari/customize-website-notifications-sfri40734/mac]Customize website notifications in Safari on Mac[/url]

Now corrected

[URL=https://support.apple.com/guide/safari/customize-website-notifications-sfri40734/mac]Customize website notifications in Safari on Mac[/url]

 

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  • Staff

There's some good advice on this thread, and I'd just like to reiterate a few things:

1) Be extremely cautious about websites you find for "removing malware." There are a lot of scam sites out there, keyed to common search terms, that identify things as malware that really aren't malware, and that promote some less ethical software to "remove" it. This can either be the result of a company that publishes unwanted software using such a site to help draw people in and get new purchases, or it can be an abuse of another company's affiliate program. Either way, the end goal is to get paid by tricking the user into downloading a program that will not solve the problem. The macsecurity site absolutely is one of these.

2) The screenshot on that macsecurity site is not malware. It's most likely the result of what we call "malvertising." What happens is that a malicious advertisement gets pushed into a legitimate site's ad feed, and when you encounter that ad, it redirects you to a scam site that leads you to believe your computer is infected when it actually is not.

3) Malvertising is extremely common these days. One of the best solutions to this problem is to use an ad blocker, such as Malwarebytes' free Browser Guard software. Ad blockers are somewhat controversial these days, but the malvertising problem means they really are needed.

4) Some form of web protection can also help to block access to these malicious sites. Browser Guard provides this as well. However, note that this is not and never can be 100% protection - like much in the security world - because the bad guys are constantly creating new sites from which to host their scams. Still, it definitely helps.

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Thanks Thomas,

I've had no pop-ups today since denying "System Settings" notifications. I would always search for the developer's site right than use a link. I have had 1Blocker extension installed in Safari for a number of years and am reasonably IT-literate, going back to the days of people thinking they had the WDEF virus. I've been using Macs since the days of the Plus! The terms virus and malware weren't even known then. In those days I would be supporting users whereas that's all I am these days.
May thanks 

Gordon

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  • Root Admin
3 hours ago, treed said:

There's some good advice on this thread, and I'd just like to reiterate a few things:

1) Be extremely cautious about websites you find for "removing malware." There are a lot of scam sites out there, keyed to common search terms, that identify things as malware that really aren't malware, and that promote some less ethical software to "remove" it. This can either be the result of a company that publishes unwanted software using such a site to help draw people in and get new purchases, or it can be an abuse of another company's affiliate program. Either way, the end goal is to get paid by tricking the user into downloading a program that will not solve the problem. The macsecurity site absolutely is one of these.

 

Amen. Yes indeed there are so many fake, bogus, or sketchy sites out there looking to either infect you or drain your wallet in the belief they'll help you. Never click on any links on such sites.

 

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