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"Farm" Fresh Eggs


NewTricks

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Good morning to everyone~

Farm fresh eggs are those bought directly from a person who has their own flock and sells to the public. it's worth the effort to find a trusted person because your culinary life will change for the better. So, what's different? LOTS!

First and most importantly, freshly laid eggs contain an invisible coating called "bloom" which is nature's way to protect the egg from bacteria. This coating also allows the egg to remain stable and stored at room temperature for 2 weeks. Some sources say longer-make your own decision. Once the egg has been washed and that bloom is down the drain, the clock starts ticking with refrigerated storage.

The two outstanding attributes of farm fresh eggs are:  yolk color and shell hardness. Ordinary mass produced eggs have yellow yolks ranging from pale to bright. Fresh egg yolks are DEEP ORANGE. The yolk membrane is robust and doesn't break easily. The shell is also incredibly hard, because the chickens have healthier feed than their industrial farmed counterparts which have a very thin, fragile shell. Cracking it open calls for smashing, not lightly tapping (well, within reason!) Speaking of shells, they are a work of art! None of this boring all white or all brown. Instead, multi-colors in pastels, cream and beige.

This all leads up to....excellent taste. Much better than any store bought I've ever had. If your taste buds are working, you'll notice.

I've driven by farm stands my whole life, even learned that someone I've known for 4 years has his own farm, complete with chickens. Did I care? Did I stop? No, too frugal and afraid.

Then? French toast made with farm fresh eggs and real maple syrup.

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Next up-Breakfast with Rhubarb Pancakes 

Rhubarb is sour, often cooked with sugar. Technically rhubarb is a vegetable, often categorized as a fruit. Usually found in jams and pies with its partner, strawberry. Be careful to use only the stalks and cut off any leafy portion, because the leaves contain "poisonous substances, including oxalic acid, a nephrotoxin." Courtesy @David H. Lipman.

This is a yours truly original inspired by New England's current rhubarb season.. Slice 1.5 cups rhubarb, add 2 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon raw sugar, simmer 10 minutes low. Add cinnamon sugar and 1/8 teaspoon molasses to pancake batter. Spoon cooked rhubarb mixture into batter, grease pan, cook on medium low and watch for bubbles. Turn. First time doing this; butter and syrup were not needed. 😄

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2Cooked barbs.jpg

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4plate barbs.jpg

Edited by NewTricks
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2 hours ago, NewTricks said:

Next up-Breakfast with Rhubarb Pancakes 

Rhubarb is sour, often cooked with sugar. Technically rhubarb is a vegetable, often categorized as a fruit. Usually found in jams and pies with its partner, strawberry.

This is a yours truly original inspired by New England's current rhubarb season.. Slice 1.5 cups rhubarb, add 2 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon raw sugar, simmer 10 minutes low. Add cinnamon sugar and 1/8 teaspoon molasses to pancake batter. Spoon cooked rhubarb mixture into batter, grease pan, cook on medium low and watch for bubbles. Turn. First time doing this; butter and syrup were not needed. 😄

And Rhubarb leaves contain poisonous substances, including oxalic acid, a nephrotoxin.

RE:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhubarb

But the stalks make a great desert !

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58 minutes ago, David H. Lipman said:

And Rhubarb leaves contain poisonous substances, including oxalic acid, a nephrotoxin.

Totally correct! Nature's protection. The leaves are HUGE, so getting to those stalks requires intent. Will edit my original post.

 

58 minutes ago, David H. Lipman said:

the stalks make a great desert !

Also correct! I've loved rhubarb for a long time.

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Just jumping in. Since the summer is coming I got some huge rhubarb in my garden. I did make rhubarb pie of it and the taste is so good. The rhubarb is still growing so I guess I can make more pies.

The thing is, when eating rhubarb pies we often use custard sauce. Here in Sweden. I don't know if there is used in more places. But custard sauce is something that is needed, I can't eat rhubarb without it.

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13 minutes ago, unknownguy said:

we often use custard sauce.

Greetings @unknownguy. Custard sauce sounds lovely! Can you tell me more? I never thought about the two together, so this is a wonderful idea for me. 

The only custard I've made sits on top of rice pudding, bread pudding as an afterthought. And as if we need more sugar in our lives, but still-the idea intrigues me. You're so lucky to have it in your garden where it's readily available. It's an acquired taste, don't you think? 

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Just in pie as a child. Had fond memories of that, but apparently my grandmother knew how to add the right amount of sugar.

Saw some rhubarb pie last year in the store so bought it. It was nothing like I remembered the pie my grandmother made.

 

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