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Any book recommendations?


Badran

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Hi,

Ive recently been trying to get into reading, since it’s really pleasant to do when the atmosphere is nice and quiet.

Been mainly reading classic literature, since I’ve bought several books last year, as I prefer to read physical copies than digital. Also never had the opportunity to read the, while I attended school.

So far, I’ve read The Stranger by Albert Camus, which was an interesting read, and on the shorter side too.

Wondering if anyone had any recommendations, or if audio books are worth it, since I don’t have my experience with those, but I’m open to them.

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Hi @Badran

Great post! I hope a lot of people contribute. 

I used audio books to help me "hear" again after ear surgery. Even if you already hear fine, I think you may find audio books a great addition to your life. The main reason is, it's (nearly) effortless. Reading requires light, holding an object, eye focus, and a comfortable position. Audio books eliminate the first three. You'll find there are different "readers" of books, from the authors themselves to people paid to read. Those in the later category range from so-so to outstanding. The cadence, timbre, resonance are unique to everyone. You might randomly discover a winner. 

My first audio book was Debt Free for Life by David Bach, read by Erik Davies. A bit unusual, but I discovered Erik Davies' voice has it all. Plus, I learned a bit from the book content, and it changed my life. You never know when a single choice will have a significant impact. 

Start small, use the library if you have one accessible. It's free. I consider libraries houses of worship. 

Last thought, do you want to stay with classical or branch out? 

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7 hours ago, David H. Lipman said:

Moby Dick

I do own this one physically. It was very verbose (I hope that’s the right one) I think I’ll jump back into it after I’m done with my current book

2 hours ago, NewTricks said:

That's a good one

My friends been egging me on to read it, and I promised I’d do so after finishing The Stranger.

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Was this plan to read your own? 

Sometimes reading goes through phases- a lot, constantly for weeks on end. Then it slows down, stops or is interrupted. Your interests also change. 

If you enjoy it, and learn something, wonderful. If it becomes a chore or a "to-do" list item, then it might not be as worthwhile for you at the moment. 

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@NewTricks

I’m making sure to pace myself instead of forcing my way through. Even if it’s only a couple of pages a night, it’s still fairly enjoyable, and it ends up being memorable too, so its easy to remember what’s happened in the books thus far.

26 minutes ago, AdvancedSetup said:

Very good list I’ll be sure to follow it and refer to it too, since there’s quite a lot.

Thank you!

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@Badran 

2 hours ago, Badran said:

Even if it’s only a couple of pages a night

Definitely a good way to go with the kind of things you're reading.  Reading is good before bed because you avoid that blue screen and also because your mind is focused on one thing without temptations to "just check something digital one last time." Who knows maybe there will be a MB book club in the future? 😉

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@Badran, no one was going to stop you from reading the Metamorphosis, but I thought, "uh oh." 

I was thinking about you earlier today, so glad you stopped by to check in. Completely agree with @David H. Lipman now read something totally different and uplifting. It may take a couple days, (or not) but by doing so, you'll hopefully regain equilibrium.

 

This might sound incredibly naive, but don't overlook some of the children's classics like Winnie the Pooh, by A A Milne, those collections are short and sweet. Whole college courses are devoted to those books!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi @NewTricks

I took a bit of a break from reading, as I decided to sit down and watch Winnie the Pooh with family instead of reading it, and it was a nice nostalgic experience.

The one reason I decided to take a break was because I ordered the book Demian, by Herman Hesse, online, so I was waiting for it to come in the mail. It just got delivered yesterday, so I may start reading it today!

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Hi @Badran,

Demian was available to me via an electronic resource, so I thought I'd read it too. Just accessed it today, but not as fortunate to sit in a comfy chair while turning pages like you. This is definitely a Herman Hesse classic.

This may or may not turn into a discussion about it, but wanted to let you know there's at least one other person reading it while you are.

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  • 2 weeks later...

@NewTricks that’s great!

I’m wondering what translation you’re reading?

A lot of these books have lots of different kinds and my friend recommended the Michael Roloff translation, which is what I bought, which was approximately $20, I want to say.

When sitting down and reading, I prefer physical for longer sessions, as I feel like I can strain my eyes by staring at a screen for too long. Granted, it can be easily avoided by putting the tablet down/stepping away from the computer for a while, but sometimes you can’t help yourself and you just want to read on

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Hi @Badran, good to hear from you. I was hoping that you'd come back so we could compare notes.

I never thought about the translation, just breezed right by that part. I see three translators; Damion Searls, James Franco and Ralph Freedman.

Damion Searls and Ralph Freedman are big names. The former for his translation prowess the latter for his contributions to literature. James Franco was too common a name to pin down.

Since I searched through 3 libraries and only found 1 online source, I went with that.  I gave up buying books. Current bookmark; Chapter Five: The Bird Fights Its Way Out of the Egg. It's gratifying to read Hesse, he definitely remembers childhood and adolescence quite well. Until reading, I'd forgotten most of it, but just a couple pages and I felt like I was 13 again. The angst and turmoil! Its amazing how we got through it. Even so, I smile while reading because looking back from a distance~the world was not really ending.

44 minutes ago, Badran said:

sometimes you can’t help yourself and you just want to read on

Definitely! You should indulge that feeling.

Keep us posted.

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