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As an antimalware, it is well known, I use Malwarebytes Premium for macOS and nothing else.

As a web protection, I use the one integrated in Safari (Google Safe Browsing and Prevent Tracking between Websites): I don't know if you can do anything else with Safari (any advice on the matter is welcome)

I prefer not to use / install other browsers, except for rare exceptions of use, followed by an immediate removal, as soon as it is no longer needed

As an ad-blocker, I have always used ka-block! but I am testing 1blocker (and I'm very satisfied with it so I think I'll make the purchase)

What can be done for emails apart from using the provider's virus / spam filter (specifically I use gmx.com)?

Thanks to anyone who can provide me with advice.

Have a good weekend

Massimiliano

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14 minutes ago, MAXBAR1 said:

What can be done for emails

What are you seeking protection against? Just malware or do you need phishing and/or spam identification?

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4 minutes ago, alvarnell said:

What are you seeking protection against? Just malware or do you need phishing and/or spam identification?

In the meantime, thanks for the quick reply

So far I have never caught any malware or fallen into phishing attempts (although they have tried).

However, given the increase in cases and the greater skill of hackers in this regard, help never hurts.

Spam, on the other hand, for the moment my provider blocks even too much (at least for now), in fact with the anti-spam filter active some emails did not arrive, they were not only addressed in the SPAM box and I had to deactivate the filter and do them resend.

That said, I would say additional Malware / Phishing security (I state that I don't click on links or download suspicious attachments).

Maybe an alert function would be enough.

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I think the OP is looking for a feature to scan the senders email address for something suspicious as well as the body of the text for misspellings and such.  I have often gotten emails regarding subscriptions expiring or a request for updating credit card data and such.  All blatantly bogus and loaded with links.  They stick out like a sore thumb; pretty easy to recognize.  But it would be nice if they were flagged!

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6 minutes ago, brcd said:

They stick out like a sore thumb; pretty easy to recognize.  But it would be nice if they were flagged!

Completely agree with this sentence

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5 hours ago, brcd said:

I think the OP is looking for a feature to scan the senders email address for something suspicious as well as the body of the text for misspellings and such.

All email is graded as it progresses from the sender's ISP through intermediary servers to the receivers ISP with scores added to the headers with precisely that purpose in mind. Mail clients, such as Apple Mail then use those scores along with rules of it's own and a bit of AI learning to identify such spam and move it to the users junk/spam mailbox. For my uses, that has been sufficient.

There is auxiliary software capable of refining the process that can be added. From everything I've read and heard from users that tried it, SpamSieve ($30 with free trial) appears to be the best at it.

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I generally like how Apple Mail handles my email. No complaints.  Once in awhile though, something that looks OK such as a bank statement will slip through.  But as I said, the email text makes it pretty obvious that it needs to go in the trash.

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22 hours ago, MAXBAR1 said:

As for the blocking of URLs recognized as dangerous (such as the ones I reported here) - for these, an ad-blocker is enough but this is not always the case - what can be done?

I can't really judge how dangerous your representative sites are, mostly because I don't have time to translate them to figure out exactly what it is that are being offered for download. MacKeeper is just a PUP, so not malicious, but I suppose could be dangerous in the hands of an inexperienced user. Did your submission result in their being blacklisted by Malwarebytes?

I would have to guess that the protections built into most all browsers, including Safari, to prevent access to known dangerous and malicious web sites is protecting you to greater extent than is your ad-blocker which only blocks ads appearing on the site and not access to the web site for other than ads.

As to what else can be done, there are several competing AV software suites that do include website blocking components. I have not tested that part of those solutions, so cannot comment on their usefulness. My approach to all aspects of website security is to use Pi-Hole for my entire network by blacklisting ads, phishing, malware, etc. sites accessed by all applications, not just browsers.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, alvarnell said:

MacKeeper is just a PUP

Reductive definition for this software as for others

1 hour ago, alvarnell said:

ad-blocker which only blocks ads appearing on the site and not access to the web site for other than ads.

1blocker, which I am testing, also just prevents these downloads from showing up (from the websites above). It also allows you to block websites, but unfortunately it is a manual thing (personal rules)

1 hour ago, alvarnell said:

to use Pi-Hole for my entire network

As I have already written to you once, I am not able to configure it (my experience with configurations such as linux is practically equal to 0) without considering that when a device is not under that network it would not be protected (read iPhone in 4G, for example when you are away from home).
I would be fine with an extension that does the work of Malwarebytes Browser Guard (for Safari, temporarily, at least until and if, the MWB extension can be presented) such as the web protection part of Malwarebytes for iOS (also of third parties, for the moment, o sigh !!!, forever)

Edited by MAXBAR1
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1 hour ago, MAXBAR1 said:

I am not able to configure it

Actually, I'm certain that it would be effortless. I simply purchased a Raspberry Pi kit from Amazon. There's a Mac app that will automatically download the OS to a microUSB, plugged in the microUSB, a monitor and keyboard and when it booted it ran through each configuration item choosing  from a list of possibilities that were quite obvious or could be left at default value.

There's a one-line terminal command that downloaded Pi-Hole and installs all components and default blacklists. Optionally, you can add additional blacklists using scripts that can be easily found on-line.

To update, you simply ssh as pi@<IP address> and enter "pihole -up"

If you need that protection for your iPhone when away, just install a VPN server at your home (on that same Raspberry Pi, if you wish) and use that. There are other VPN profilers that promise to block bad sites, but you have to trust that they won't harvest your PII.

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Thanks @alvarnell , but I prefer to avoid experiments of this type, to avoid problems with my ISP (normally because the fixed line works they require you not to change the DNS on the router on the Fiber / FWA lines at the router level and to make as few changes as possible and it is It has already been an achievement of the last period to have the modem free (until recently it was mandatory to use a modem provided by the ISP completely blocked or almost on which it was not possible to modify practically anything - this is the beauty of being Italian).

I would prefer, as I wrote, a browser extension, to be used on Safari (iOS and macOS) as both me and my father (the only internet users at home we only use these two systems and this browser)

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4 hours ago, MAXBAR1 said:
4 hours ago, alvarnell said:

MacKeeper is just a PUP

Reductive definition for this software as for others

Not sure what you meant by this (or what you wrote before editing) but I was referring to this.

Edited by alvarnell
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Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, alvarnell said:

Not sure what you meant by this (or what you wrote before editing) but I was referring to this.

I would simply define (but it is my personal opinion) software such as those considered in this post Definitely unwanted programs (not only potentially) - mainly for their way of proposing themselves or for aspects that I have read on the internet, from which I will do everything not to be even touched (as I always did with Flash). I also don't like Java applications (I've only used one, for a few years in the past, because it's required, but luckily that's not the case anymore).

Edited by MAXBAR1
clarified the concept better
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OK, that's exactly why Malwarebytes (and a few other scanners) treat the as such. There are others who consider them essential to their computing experience (I'm not one of those). The PUP designation is for those in between that haven't made up their minds.

Not sure what your aversion to Java is. Most websites wouldn't exist without it. Last time I checked there had never been a Mac instance of java for app use ever being exploited. It was the browser plug-in that often got users in trouble. 

But you are right that there are very few user apps that require it any more. I still have one or two on my Mac, but haven't needed to use them routinely for quite while.

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13 minutes ago, alvarnell said:

Not sure what your aversion to Java is.

My distaste for Java is due to a personal experience.
The software that are used with the Public Administration in Italy (the only ones I had to use) to make them cross-platform, are written in Java and normally require obsolete Java versions (even two different ones for software connected to each other in the same year) and different for every year forcing you to keep multiple Java versions installed (obsolete is an understatement) to see data from previous years and in the Windows world I come from (abandoned for 8 years now) having multiple and mostly obsolete Java versions installed has always been a real jattura.

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Just to add a little feedback here on a couple topics...

With regard to e-mail protection, I honestly can't see us doing that at any point in the near future. In my opinion, the best place for e-mail protection is on the server, because then there's no concern about what kind of system the user has. (For example, on iOS, there's no such thing as an antivirus program, but you could still get an e-mail designed to trigger a zero-click or one-click vulnerability in iOS and install malware.)

Further, doing e-mail protection on the Mac gets complicated, because we can't really touch Mail files without corrupting your mailboxes, and we'd have to support all other major Mac e-mail clients on top of that. Alternately, we could get access to your e-mail account, but that's a pretty big deal in terms of privacy, and we'd never be able to guarantee that you're actually protected on any other devices as something running on your mail server could.

For web protection, that's definitely something we want to implement on the Mac, but I don't have a timeframe that I can commit to.

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