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Computer won't boot normally - multiple BSOD errors


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  • Root Admin

Yes, that highly suggest some type of profile corruption.

Again, please try to create a new account to try to login with. Even a standard new user account should work. If that too does not login then it is probably going to take more time to fix than it would be to backup your data and do a clean install.

We could also try doing an in-place Windows Repair that basically just re-installs Windows keeping all your current settings

 

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  • Root Admin

Without a full good backup to restore from you may not have any choice. This is one of the main reasons so many people push for users to have good, solid backups.

Please try the following and see if you can get it fixed.

How to Do a Repair Install of Windows 10 with an In-place Upgrade
https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/16397-repair-install-windows-10-place-upgrade.html

 

Once you do have the computer repaired then make sure you make a good solid Image style backup so that you can easily restore to a saved image backup.

 

 

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  • Root Admin

Without some type of log there is no way to judge or guess. The following tool would also find and remove if it were. Though I would be very surprised if it was due to an infection as I do not recall any infection performing as you describe

Kaspersky Rescue Disk
https://support.kaspersky.com/viruses/krd18

 

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I've made some progress but still haven't found the problem.  After turning off all overclocking and reducing the memory frequency by 400mhz, Windows has successfully booted into normal mode successful, no BSOD for a while; files and folders in excellent shape, restarting showed no problems either.  

I don't foresee the overclocking of the CPU as the problem, I'm guessing one of the memory DIMMS is faulty ?

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  • Staff

It could be the RAM, the motherboard, or it could also be the memory controller on the CPU (these components, known as 'Uncore' typically in Intel XTU and the like, are often less capable of higher overclocks and voltages than the cores themselves, and using overclocked memory timings/profiles (such as higher XMP speeds/timings) can sometimes lead to instability).  As with all components, it's pretty much luck of the draw with regards to how capable (or limited) they might be for overclocking.

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Yes, you can set your memory to its normal frequency and test.  Have you ever changed the thermal paste on the system?  How are the fans?  Are they clogged up with dust and whatnot, or is airflow still good?  Make sure temps are OK and you can rule that out as a factor.

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Primarily your CPU temps.  Yeah, if it's been 2.5 years, it's definitely time to apply new paste.  If you aren't comfortable with it/having done it before, you should be able to take it to any local PC repair shop and they can do it for you.  I personally use and recommend Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut, especially if it is a laptop as it is a paste with a long life (it dries much slower than most other pastes, meaning you don't have to change it as frequently) and it is highly thermally conductive (but it is not electrically conductive, so no harm if a bit gets onto other components when applying it).

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If the issue is related to heat, then running it in a warmer room will certainly make things worse.  The main thing is that over time, the thermal paste that is used for moving heat from your CPU to the system's heatsink, will dry out, and possibly crack over time.  As this happens, its ability to move heat from the IHS (integrated heat spreader) that covers your CPU to the bottom of the heatsink will decrease, making temps get much hotter and eventually possibly leading to issues such as crashes and thermal throttling.

I would suggest measuring your CPU temps, especially the uncore/memory controller temps, to see how hot it is getting.  If it is anywhere around 90C or above, that's the danger zone for temps as most components are designed to run below around 100C, which is normally around where the throttling threshold is reached (the CPU will drop its clock speeds to compensate for the heat), however if it can't cool itself fast enough by throttling, errors and crashes may occur, and the system may shut itself down to protect the hardware from damage due to the heat.

This is all just theory as I obviously have no physical access to your device, however it is a possibility.  Depending on what software you use for overclocking, you might be able to use it measure temps, or you can use a utility such as HWInfo to determine what your temps are.

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By the way, if you look at HWInfo, the temp you want to watch (other than the CPU, Core, and Package temps) is the Ring temp, as the Ring is the same as the Uncore (just different words for the same components).  If your temps aren't running hot, then obviously the issue must be elsewhere.

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