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PrivaZer, a good clean Up Tool ?


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Posted (edited)

Hello, is PrivaZer, a good clean Up Tool ?

Source: 

https://privazer.com/en/

 

Is this really a good Tool, to clean up a computer System ?

Or i can damaged also my computer System ?

I  this really better, than CCleaner, the data miner and very often home sick ?

A deeper discussion, about this can you find, here https://www.wilderssecurity.com/threads/privazer-discussion-thread.341840/

Can you tell me in three simple sentences , is this a good, or a bad Tool for this task.

MAM

Edited by AdvancedSetup
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        When it 1st. came out. It cleaned to much for me... I don't recall what it took out but I needed it - maybe they did a better job over the years?    As for CCleaner I posted this appx: a year ago.........  I use BleachBit now.....   good luck...   maybe someone else will add there comments..... 73's

 

 

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  • Root Admin

Without a lot of analysis I'd say it seems risky. Opening and or editing the pagefile and hibernation file would also seem risky. Unless I'm mistaken, I'm not aware of Microsoft releasing the file structure of those files (though I suppose it's possible to reverse engineer them) so editing them is not supported from Microsoft either.

CCleaner has had various complaints on the Web since Avast took them over. You'd need to decide yourself if you still want or believe you need the program

https://helpdeskgeek.com/free-tools-review/why-you-shouldnt-download-ccleaner-for-windows-anymore/

https://www.howtogeek.com/361112/heres-what-you-should-use-instead-of-ccleaner/

I suppose it matters what you think you're going to achieve by these clean up tools. If you're doing something illegal then sooner or later with or without these tools you're quite likely to get caught. Web browsers and applications already do a ton of live call back to home base and report on all sorts of varying amounts of information as to what you're doing with your computer. Cleaning up after the fact isn't going to protect you all that much.

 

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26 minutes ago, AdvancedSetup said:

I suppose it matters what you think you're going to achieve by these clean up tools. If you're doing something illegal then sooner or later with or without these tools you're quite likely to get caught. Web browsers and applications already do a ton of live call back to home base and report on all sorts of varying amounts of information as to what you're doing with your computer. Cleaning up after the fact isn't going to protect you all that much.

This is why I never bought into the idea of detecting cookies in scans (and why I am glad that Malwarebytes never adopted a policy of targeting them/removing them).  If you don't want to be tracked by cookies you have to block them.  Every major browser includes options to control/block cookies (though IE does it best in my opinion, giving the option to get a prompt when a site wants to create/save a cookie, allowing you to allow it, block it, always allow it, or always block it, similar to how a firewall works).  In fact, I might suggest Malwarebytes create a browser add-on with that functionality as I've never found one.  All the ones I've seen require setting them up in advance to block/allow cookies for specific sites and for the user to magically know whether or not a specific cookie is required for a site to function.  A simple 'Allow once', 'Block once', 'Allow always', 'Block always' system for cookie handling would be awesome.

As for everything else these tools address, such as temp files and so-called 'junk' entries in the registry (MRU keys and the like which are often targeted as some kind of privacy risk even though an attacker would need to get access to your registry to read them, and even then it would only list the most recently used executables/files which isn't very useful information under most conditions (do you really care if an attacker knows that you launched Steam recently or that you installed MS Office?), most of it either doesn't need to be deleted because it has no impact on performance or privacy, or there are already built-in tools to deal with them such as the included Disk Cleanup utility that ships with Windows.

I used to run multiple temp cleaners/junk cleaners and occasionally used the registry cleaner in CCleaner (though I would check every entry it detected to verify that it was something that was either orphaned from an already uninstalled application or something that was safe to remove which is a very tedious process and I would NOT recommend anyone ever use such a tool unless they know what they are looking at in the results) but these days I don't mess with them.  I might occasionally clear out my history and browsing data in my browser and occasionally run the Disk Cleanup utility, but other than that I don't bother.  Removing files from a drive and entries from the registry will not make a system run faster and I have never seen any testing or validation of any kind that showed that they could.  If a system is running slower than normal it is either an issue with one or more applications running in the background (the most common cause of slow system startup/slow performance by far), a problem with the OS itself such as a driver issue or other system problem (none of which would be addressed by any registry cleaner or so-called 'registry repair tool' I've ever seen), a hardware issue such as a failing drive, or it is an issue with insufficient RAM, though with most systems having a minimum of 8GB off the shelf makes that far less likely to be the cause.

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Posted (edited)

 

So you think that should be used with caution? !

MAM

Edited by AdvancedSetup
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If at all, yes, definitely.  Frankly, a registry cleaner/optimizer has no real use any more in modern operating systems.  They will not improve performance, won't fix any problems/issues, and have the potential to do great harm should they remove anything they shouldn't.  My personal advice is to simply not use them.

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