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Water-based Air Conditioner cools without harmful Chemicals etc.

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Water-based Air Conditioner cools without harmful Chemicals

"https://www.rtoz.org/2018/01/20/water-based-air-conditioner-cools-without-harmful-chemicals/"

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has pioneered a new water-based air-conditioning system that cools air to as low as 18 degrees Celsius without the use of energy-intensive compressors and environmentally harmful chemical refrigerants.

This game-changing technology could potentially replace the century-old air-cooling principle that is still being used in our modern-day air-conditioners.

https://youtu.be/PkqWVIa0ANQ


A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has pioneered a new water-based air-conditioning system that cools air to as low as 18 degrees Celsius without the use of energy-intensive compressors and environmentally harmful chemical refrigerants.

This game-changing technology could potentially replace the century-old air-cooling principle that is still being used in our modern-day air-conditioners.

Suitable for both indoor and outdoor use, the novel system is portable and it can also be customised for all types of weather conditions.

The research team’s novel air-conditioning system is cost-effective to produce, and it is also more eco-friendly and sustainable. The system consumes about 40 per cent less electricity than current compressor-based air-conditioners used in homes and commercial buildings.

This translates into more than 40 per cent reduction in carbon emissions. In addition, it adopts a water-based cooling technology instead of using chemical refrigerants such as chlorofluorocarbon and hydrochlorofluorocarbon for cooling, thus making it safer and more environmentally-friendly.

To add another feather to its eco-friendliness cap, the novel system generates potable drinking water while it cools ambient air.


Protection for pacemakers

ETH scientists have developed a special protective membrane made of cellulose that significantly reduces the build-up of fibrotic tissue around cardiac pacemaker implants, as reported in the current issue of the journal Biomaterials. Their development could greatly simplify surgical procedures for patients with cardiac pacemakers.

"Every pacemaker has to be replaced at some point. When this time comes, typically after about five years when the device's battery expires, the patient has to undergo surgery," explains Aldo Ferrari, Senior Scientist in ETH Professor Dimos Poulikakos's group and at Empa. "If too much fibrotic tissue has formed around the pacemaker, it complicates the procedure," he explains. In such cases, the surgeon has to cut into and remove this excess tissue. Not only does that prolong the operation, it also increases the risk of complications such as infection.

Microstructure reduces fibrotic tissue formation

Edit - added articles

 

Edited by sman

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