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Is Comodo Firewall any good?

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Hello! So I've seen videos and even did a bit of research on Comodo firewall and I was wondering if it is any good and if it is necessary to have another firewall? I'm using Adblock plus chrome extension, Malwarebytes chrome extension, Malwarebytes free, and avast free and just the usual Windows firewall 

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It's very good, but for general users it's way too complicated and easy for a user to mess things up. I've used it several times since 2006, lastly version 10, but no longer, too many issues, including poor quality control by Comodo, I forever feel like I'm in Beta testing with them, sometimes Alpha testing - no, MWB is not quite as bad as them on quality assurance, it's improved hugely in the past year here.

MWB have bought I firewall company called Binisoft. I suspect they may integrate it into MWB Premium this year, but it's still available as a standalone. It works on top of Windows Firewall which is very effective, rather than replacing it, so it's a better solution than most other firewall out there, in my humble personal opinion.

Good luck.

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2 hours ago, Cavehomme said:

It's very good, but for general users it's way too complicated and easy for a user to mess things up. I've used it several times since 2006, lastly version 10, but no longer, too many issues, including poor quality control by Comodo, I forever feel like I'm in Beta testing with them, sometimes Alpha testing - no, MWB is not quite as bad as them on quality assurance, it's improved hugely in the past year here.

MWB have bought I firewall company called Binisoft. I suspect they may integrate it into MWB Premium this year, but it's still available as a standalone. It works on top of Windows Firewall which is very effective, rather than replacing it, so it's a better solution than most other firewall out there, in my humble personal opinion.

Good luck.

I well definitely look into Binisoft since I don't have premium MWB, thanks!

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4 hours ago, Cavehomme said:

It's very good, but for general users it's way too complicated and easy for a user to mess things up.

Yep, complex software firewalls like COMODO which include full on HIPS functionality are way too complicated for normal users (and can even have more knowledgeable users scratching their heads with all the alerts for normally benign activities that get flagged).

Binisoft is a good option and there are a few others that work similarly as front-ends for the built in Windows Firewall, using the same Windows Filtering Platform (WFP) protocols/APIs/infrastructure that the Windows Firewall uses that are also available for free with various capabilities and features in case you're curious:

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is Malwarebytes Benisoft heavy or complex? I'm not a very advanced user and share my laptop and don't wanna slow it down or mess up anything

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Nope, it's very simple.  It just displays a prompt whenever a new application wants to access the web allowing you to allow it or block it, giving you control over which apps can access the web and which ones cannot just as a good firewall should.  No HIPS components or complicated functions, just the straightforward application level filtering that a good software firewall should provide.

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Once I get better internet that will download things I will definitely look into downloading it! Thank you!

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I'm on mobile 

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On 3/6/2019 at 1:45 PM, exile360 said:

Yep, complex software firewalls like COMODO which include full on HIPS functionality are way too complicated for normal users (and can even have more knowledgeable users scratching their heads with all the alerts for normally benign activities that get flagged).

Binisoft is a good option and there are a few others that work similarly as front-ends for the built in Windows Firewall, using the same Windows Filtering Platform (WFP) protocols/APIs/infrastructure that the Windows Firewall uses that are also available for free with various capabilities and features in case you're curious:

 

 

2

Don't forget GlassWire! Very great utility. Surprisingly lightweight, very intuitive to use and understand, and incredibly flexible. It is technically its own Firewall program, with its own powerful and unique features, but I do believe that it actually makes extensive use of the Windows Filtering Platform. In fact, that might be why it's so lightweight.

GlassWire also doesn't continually nag you with User Account Control, you can download it off the Steam store, and you can purchase a license for up to 10 devices at once. And yes, there's an Android version too~

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22 hours ago, Amaroq_Starwind said:

Don't forget GlassWire! Very great utility. Surprisingly lightweight, very intuitive to use and understand, and incredibly flexible. It is technically its own Firewall program, with its own powerful and unique features, but I do believe that it actually makes extensive use of the Windows Filtering Platform. In fact, that might be why it's so lightweight.

GlassWire also doesn't continually nag you with User Account Control, you can download it off the Steam store, and you can purchase a license for up to 10 devices at once. And yes, there's an Android version too~

Yeah, I didn't include GlassWire because their actual firewall functionality isn't free (only basic network monitoring; you have to buy a license to get the actual firewall component).

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Yeah, it's a bummer but it is understandable.  As a network monitor it is a pretty cool tool though with a very nice UI.  I guess after putting all that work in they want to get paid for it somehow so it makes sense that the protection/firewall feature would be paid only.

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I don't understand why all these other firewalls are being proposed when Malwarebytes recently acquired Binisoft, rebranded it as theirs, offered ot free of chargem and today I installed it as the Malwarebytes firewall. Using it on default settings, that's all that 99% of users need!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Cavehomme said:

I don't understand why all these other firewalls are being proposed when Malwarebytes recently acquired Binisoft, rebranded it as theirs, offered ot free of chargem and today I installed it as the Malwarebytes firewall. Using it on default settings, that's all that 99% of users need!

Very true, but for those of us who also use additional defenses like large HOSTS files (such as the one provided by Malwarebytes' own hpHosts/Hosts-File.net) it's a no-go unfortunately since it requires that the DNS Client service remain active (the service must be disabled when using a large HOSTS file, and its functionality is rendered moot by configuring a local loopback/null address/sever on the system which actually makes DNS lookups even faster than with the service enabled/active).  I like to offer options because of that, and also just because there are and have been a lot of good, free options available since WFP was first implemented in Windows Vista with a wide range of features and capabilities.

Edited by exile360

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I think perspective is needed on Binisoft's Windows Firewall Control now a Mawarebytes' product.

" Windows Firewall Control is a powerful tool which extends the functionality of Windows Firewall and provides new extra features which makes Windows Firewall better. "

It isn't a Firewall.  It is a front-end to the Native OS' Firewall and adds additional constructs and adds extended functionality to what is already built-into the Windows OS.

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Yep, that's what most WFP based firewalls are these days, especially the free ones.  They're either front-ends for the existing firewall or they use the same framework, APIs and functions, usually while adding other features such as prompts for outbound connections (as is the case with the former Binisoft firewall).

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To my understanding, there shouldn't be any conflicts between GlassWire and the MalwareBytes/Binisoft WFC, but I should probably ask the GlassWire company to be sure.

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As long as you're using the free version of GlassWire there shouldn't be, but if using the paid version with the full firewall capabilities baked in then you may end up getting double alerts/notifications and such (but I believe both still honor the built in WFC with Advanced Security rules so if one is set to alert and the other is set to be silent it should be OK).

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Cool, yep, that's what I figured.  Also notice what they said about "your firewall rules" because that's the key wording.  They didn't say "our firewall rules" or "its firewall rules", they specified "your" which tells me that they are indeed using the underlying Windows Firewall with Advanced Security rules to control access for applications just like most other WFP based firewalls, meaning they all pretty much do the same thing and simply add their own functionality into the built in firewall functionality.  That's both a good and a bad thing.  It's good because it establishes a standard and makes working with and troubleshooting these firewalls universal and simple, but it's bad because if ever a serious vulnerability is discovered in the WFP framework that the bad guys learn to exploit we're going to be in real trouble because most firewalls and web filters (including the Web Protection in Malwarebytes 3 as well as the former Binisoft WFC of course) are using it.

That said, I think it's pretty solid and has proven itself at this point.  It's been around since Vista which goes all the way back to 2006/2007 and has yet to show any real weakness that I'm aware of so I think we're in pretty good shape.

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Any WFP-based firewall programs, if they are already aware of your firewall rules, could probably also have their own firewall (in the event that a vulnerability is discovered in the WFP) and only use it when requested by the user.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Next-generation_firewall 

So I did a bit of reading. Turns out that the WFP has actually had a few vulnerabilities in the past, and in general, most existing software firewalls aren't 100% effective anymore. Much like how MalwareBytes uses a lot of next-generation anti-malware technology, there is a growing need for next-generation firewalls. Maybe the acquisition of Binisoft will result in significant improvements to network security as time goes on.

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