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By means of a suggestion, the feature to turn on/off realtime protection should be password protected.  Also, have experienced moments when the realtime protection turned itself off and the app was returned to the free version.  It was necessary to re-enter the licence information in order to reactivate it.  Once, a reboot was required before the licence info could be entered and was accepted.  This kind of buggy behaviour does not engender complete confidence.

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30 minutes ago, Aarkus said:

the feature to turn on/off realtime protection should be password protected.

In the case of being logged in as a non-admin user, I would agree with you, but feel requiring an admin to have to enter a password to be totally unnecessary. It's not a locked feature and I see no reason why it should be.

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14 hours ago, Aarkus said:

Also, have experienced moments when the realtime protection turned itself off and the app was returned to the free version.  It was necessary to re-enter the licence information in order to reactivate it.  Once, a reboot was required before the licence info could be entered and was accepted.  This kind of buggy behaviour does not engender complete confidence.

That is not normal behavior, and indicates that something was interfering with the application's settings. This could be some kind of ill-advised "cleaning" tool deleting what it identified as "junk files" (which really aren't junk), other accidental deletion of Malwarebytes settings files, some other third-party app interference, hard drive corruption, etc.

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Thanks for the reply Thomas.  I had Avast installed alongside and am wondering if this might have caused the interference you mention.  in any event, I have removed Avast since posting my initial comment (for this and other reasons) and will monitor to see if it was indeed the cause.

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Ok....so not Avast, as the same thing happened on my other Mac last night. Am now thinking its Onyx. Should have thought of this first. I ran it for the first time in years a few days ago and it did cause a problem with another app immediately that I had to sort out. Ran diagnostics on the hard drives just to make sure, but they seem fine. Also did an uninstall/reinstall of MBAM on both Macs. Now seem to be running well again.

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Avast has been known to trigger false positives that erroneously removed components of our software, but I'm not aware of such an incident going on right now. I think it's more likely that this is Onyx removing something it shouldn't have.

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I wanted to say, if it can be useful, that I regularly use Maintenance (it would be an app that corresponds to the Onyx automatic cleaning panel - it's of the same software house) and I've never had any problems with malwarebytes for macOS  nor in versions 3.x premium  neither in the 1.x versions. The software has always worked perfectly even using uninstallers (official app downloaded from the Mac AppStore) for applications that were not provided (the most famous is Microsoft Office 2016); I add that malwarebytes has never used me excessively the resources of the Mac (neither CPU nor Ram or other)

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Just to close the loop on this, I am convinced it was Onyx. As mentioned, it affected another app immediately, which I had to then fix. Other cleaner-type apps I've used in the past also tended to do this. This is why I had stopped using them --and will do so again. As for Avast, I only had it on my systems for about a week. During that time, it did not find anything or, to my knowledge, remove anything. The reason I initially suspected it was because I thought there might have been some conflict between two realtime engines.

In closing, I'd just like to say that I've enjoyed your material throughout the years, Thomas. I go back to 'The Safe Mac' blog and your original software. The blog was especially invaluable to me as someone who had migrated at that time from Windows machines to Macs.

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I'm glad I could help!

I'd definitely recommend not using any kind of "cleaning" apps. Your Mac doesn't need that, so they just serve as a way to potentially cause problems.

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And to uninstall applications that do not have uninstaller like Microsoft Office 2016, how do I need to do (it is not the only app in those conditions)?

Thanks

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For apps that do not have an uninstaller, you should consult with the developer. In this case, Microsoft has the following page:

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/uninstall-office-2016-for-mac-eefa1199-5b58-43af-8a3d-b73dc1a8cae3

Those instructions don't include some other items that need removing, though:

/Library/Application Support/Microsoft/
/Library/LaunchAgents/com.microsoft.update.agent.plist
/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.microsoft.autoupdate.helper.plist
/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.microsoft.office.licensingV2.helper.plist
/Library/PrivilegedHelperTools/com.microsoft.autoupdate.helper
/Library/PrivilegedHelperTools/com.microsoft.office.licensingV2.helper

Microsoft has provided the perfect example of how NOT to do uninstalls on the Mac. However, "cleaning" tools and other generic app uninstallers are not the solution, as they often get it wrong, either not removing everything they should or, worse, removing things that are not related to the app being removed.

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I appreciate your advice but not all identified developers website  give instructions on this (or as Microsoft give them not complete).

 Can you explain to me why the uninstallers are present on the Mac AppStore and, for example, why Onyx or Maintenance are developed by an Apple certified developer if, as you say, they can damage the system? I'd like to know what you think about it. Thank you

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Those apps are found on the App Store for the same reason that there are junk antivirus apps that don't actually detect much of anything on the App Store... Apple doesn't do a great job of dealing with those kinds of things.

Cleaning apps cause more problems than they solve, and they really don't solve any problems... they only make the user believe they're solving problems. I've actually tested a bunch of "cleaning" apps and other generic app uninstallers, and they don't do a good job of removing all components. It's rare that they do a perfect job.

My advice is to always make sure you know how to remove something before you install it. If there's no obvious uninstaller, and there's no mention of an uninstaller in the official documentation or on the official support website, think twice about installing it.

Apps from the App Store are exceptions, of course. Those can simply be dragged to the trash to uninstall them... although this still may leave some app data behind.

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