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Automatic Repair error in Windows 10

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Hello, malwarebyters !

My PC is unable to boot. There is a message error.automatic-repair-couldnt-repair-your-pc.jpg.f0213b62f9d93f87f2af2fc0702c1c6e.jpg

I wanted to run an offline scan with Bitdefender in my browser and then this error occurred.

I tried more methods on the Internet but no solution.

Can you assist me ?

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Posted (edited)

Here's some repair/recovery/restore options (in this order).   Be sure to backup your stuff if you don't want to take the chance of losing it.:
1 - Startup Repair.  Run it 3 times, rebooting in between tries.

2 - System Restore to a point before this started happening.

3 - DISM/SFC repair (DISM doesn't work with W7, although SFC does)  - doesn't work if you're not able to boot to Windows (let me know and I'll post a way to do it from Startup Repair)
    

Then please run the following DISM commands to see if there's any problems with the system (from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt).  Press Enter after typing it:


   

    FYI - I have repaired systems using the last command even though problems weren't found with the first 2 - so I suggest running them all.

    From this article: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824869.aspx

    You can also run sfc.exe /scannow from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt to check for further corruption. Include the CBS log (located at C:\Windows\Logs\CBS\CBS.log) if you'd like to have a Windows Update expert check it (I don't check them because I can't read them)
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth



4 - RESET using the "Keep My Files" option (W8 calls this a REFRESH; W7 and earlier doesn't have this function)

5 - Repair install of the OS (Thanks to FreeBooter!):
    "How To Perform a Repair Installation For Windows 8, 8.1 and 10"
    https://www.winhelp.us/non-destructive-reinstall-of-windows-8-and-8-1.html

6 - RESET using the "Remove Everything" option (W8 calls this a RESET; W7 and earlier doesn't have this function)

If using W7 or earlier, this can be accomplished by resetting the system by use of the recovery partition/recovery disks/recovery drive.
If you don't have them, you can usually order them from the OEM manufacturer of your system ( US points of contact here:  http://www.carrona.org/recdisc.html )

7 - Wipe and reinstall from the Recovery Partition (if so equipped)

8 - Wipe and reinstall from Recovery Media - to include deleting all partitions.
If you don't have them, you can usually order them from the OEM manufacturer of your system ( US points of contact here:  http://www.carrona.org/recdisc.html )  You can also download W7/8.1/10 from Microsoft starting on this page:  https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/

9 - A clean install of Windows.  This is a troubleshooting tool - and as such is slightly different from the previous steps.  In short, if it fixes the problem, then the problem was in the software.  If it doesn't fix the problem, then the problem is most likely in the hardware.
A clean install is:
- Windows is installed to a freshly partitioned hard drive with legitimate installation media (W10:  https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 ).
- The installation media is only a copy of Windows, not the OEM recovery disks that you can make on some systems.
- Windows is fully updated after it's installed.  That's ALL updates - none excepted.
- NO 3rd party software is installed.
- There are no errors in Device Manager (if you find any, post back for suggestions).

This will wipe everything off of the computer, so it's advisable to backup your stuff first.
Also, it will wipe out all the special software that the OEM added to the system, so if you rely on any of that - let us know what it is so we can figure out a way to save/download it (the easiest way is to create/obtain the OEM;s recovery media)

If unable to find recovery media that has the software (or if you suspect that this is a hardware problem), you can make an image of your system that'll preserve everything in the state that it was in when you made the image.
One drawback to this is that you're making an image of a malfunctioning system - so, if there are errors in the system software, you'll have a nice copy of them :(
Another drawback is that the image of the system will be very large - so you'll most likely need a large external drive to store it on.
But, this will allow you to save everything on the hard drive (although you'll need an image viewer to get things out of the image).
The point here is that, if it's a hardware problem, then you can restore the system to the point it was when you made the image - after you repair the hardware problem.
You can obtain more info on imaging in the Backup/Imaging/DiskMgmt forums located here:  http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/f/238/backup-imaging-and-disk-management-software/

The point of doing this (the clean install) is to:
- rule out Windows as a problem (if the problem continues, it's not a Windows problem as you completely replaced Windows
- rule out 3rd party software (if the problem continues, it's not a 3rd party software problem as you didn't install any 3rd party software)
- so, if the problem continues, it must be a hardware problem.

OTOH, if the problem stops, then it was either a Windows or 3rd party software problem.  If the problem doesn't come back, then you've fixed it.  Then all that remains is setting the computer back up the way that you'd like it and importing your data from the backup you made.

 

Edited by usasma

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Good afternoon, @usasma !

Thank you anyway for your answer !

I've solved my problem. A friend made a bootable USB and I reinstalled the Windows.

Do you know where the files in the old Windows are ? I want to delete them.

 

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Usually there is a Windows.old folder in the root (C:\) that contains those files

you can also run cleanmgr.exe from the Run dialog - then select “Clean up system files”

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@usasma

My new Windows is located in the C partition. See the D partition in this picture, it has all folders of the old Windows.

5af83e8d2c10c_2018-05-1311_40_30-Window.png.f7bca8b2a3aa77016c1debbaa852b5ca.png

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If the D: drive is a separate physical drive from the C:  drive - then you can unplug the D: drive and see if the system works normally

 

or, you can rename the folders that you want to delete - and see if the system works without them

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