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Miraculous transformation of MBAM 3.0


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Up to a month ago, everywhere on MBAM forum the only valid statement was "MBAM is not an antivirus..." and "MBAM doesn't target this or that...." and "you should not run without an antivirus installed..."

Now, all of a sudden MBAM is alpha and omega, the best thing since sliced bread , the only antivirus you will ever need..
 

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And your point is?

 

Programmes change with new versions, new features and capabilities get added.

 

If you want another Antivirus example just look at Microsoft's Windows Defender.

Before Windows 8, Defender was only an Antispyware programme, since Windows 8 it is a full Antivirus programme.

Things change.

Edited by nukecad
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It is Malwarebytes' presumption that because MBAE can prevent some malicious activity, it's inclusion in MBAM v3.x makes it an anti virus.

However, MBAM v3.x ...

  • Is still limited in its file targeting
  • Can't deal with the aftereffects of a file infecting virus
  • Can't restore a trojanized ( patched ) file to its pre-infected state

PS:  Since it is a Beta, discussion on MBAM v3.x should be limited to;   Malwarebytes 3.0 Beta

 

Edited by David H. Lipman
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15 minutes ago, nukecad said:

 

If you want another Antivirus example just look at Microsoft's Windows Defender.

Before Windows 8, Defender was only an Antispyware programme, since Windows 8 it is a full Antivirus programme.

Things change.

Wrong!

Defender is just a name change. Before Win 8 , you had Defender and MSE  (a fully flagged AV), after Win8 , Defender is MSE .

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19 minutes ago, David H. Lipman said:

 

  • Is still limited in its file targeting
  • Can't deal with the aftereffects of a file infecting virus
  • Can't restore a trojanized ( patched ) file to its pre-infected state

 

 

If this is the case, why has been announced as "the only antivirus you need"???

"Today we have released the beta of our next-generation product, Malwarebytes 3.0! This product is built to provide comprehensive protection against today’s threat landscape so that you can finally replace your traditional antivirus."
 

 

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8 hours ago, miracle said:

Wrong!

Defender is just a name change. Before Win 8 , you had Defender and MSE  (a fully flagged AV), after Win8 , Defender is MSE .

Wrong yourself;

No names have been changed, both programmes still exist with their original names.

MSE has not changed its name to Windows Defender, it still exists as MSE for use by those with Windows 7 and Vista.
And it still get version updates, (to v4.10 last month), not just definition updates.

Defender, post Win 8, has incorporated AV functions and improved it's functionality - but it is not just MSE renamed.

Which was the whole point of my comment- programmes change their functionallity without changing their names.

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The problem here is with Microsoft.  Microsoft bought GeCAD's RAV and eventually released Windows Live Anti Virus.  It sucked compared to traditional anti virus applications so it was released for free.  Microsoft fragmented the software into niches.  they share the same core kernel but vary the engine and signatures.  That's why there is Forefront, the monthly Malware Removal Tool ( MRT ) On-Demand scanner, MSE, Defender, et. al.  MRT is probably their bright spot in a dark background as it specifically has a limited target spectrum and a new version is delivered every month and performs a relevant scan every month.

Microsoft has however missed the mark.  I still remember how they integrated Central Point Anti Virus ( CPAV ) and named it MSAV.  It didn't last long and eventually Central point software was bought by Norton Utilities and CPAV was rolled into Norton AV and CPAV was discontinued.  CPAV is now a part of Symantec's software ( Symantec Corporate/Enterprise and Norton retail ).

What Microsoft has is not broad spectrum and not very good.  And that is all that counts.  One needs an anti virus application from a traditional anti virus company to get the best protection.  Sure Windows Defender and MSE are better than nothing but when compared to Eset, Avira, Avast/Grisoft and Kaspersky ( and some others ) there is just no comparison.

 

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38 minutes ago, nukecad said:

Wrong yourself;

No names have been changed, both programmes still exist with their original names.

MSE has not changed its name to Windows Defender, it still exists as MSE for use by those with Windows 7 and Vista.
And it still get version updates, (to v4.10 last month), not just definition updates.

Defender, post Win 8, has incorporated AV functions and improved it's functionality - but it is not just MSE renamed.

Which was the whole point of my comment- programmes change their functionallity without changing their names.

Read here:

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/protect/forum/mse-protect_scanning/what-is-the-difference-in-windows-defender-and/54cd144f-2957-4368-a2a4-f74d44595847

 

MSE in Win7 and earlier is a full security program. Windows Defender is only an anti-spyware program. MSE has the same definitions so it will shut down WD. In Win 8, 8.1 &10, Windows Defender is a full security suite, basically MSE rebranded.
 

Windows Defender running in Windows 8 / 8.1 / 10 For the first time, Microsoft shipped an anti-virus package built into the operating system with Windows 8: it is called "Windows Defender", and does basically the same thing as MSE.

 You won't be lost using Windows 8 / 8.1 / 10 if you are familiar with MSE.

So, to keep things clear, Windows Defender for Windows 8 and later is mostly the same thing as Microsoft Security Essentials for Windows 7 and earlier!

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28 minutes ago, David H. Lipman said:

Sure Windows Defender and MSE are better than nothing but when compared to Eset, Avira, Avast/Grisoft and Kaspersky ( and some others ) there is just no comparison.

 

According to AV Test , MSE has a detection rate of 99.8% of widespread and prevalent malware  and only 88% for zero day items. Now combine MSE with the old MBAM (which was supposedly designed for "zero day" items and you will get a very powerful combination , simple , no bloat.

I have run this combination for years without issues

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There are lies, damn lies, statistics and there are benchmarks.  All can be skewed by an agenda.

If Microsoft had a good AV product, they would not have discontinued Windows Live AV, which was a paid-for product.  Even Microsoft has publicly admitted their offering isn't as good as traditional AV vendor products.

Many people have had a malware free experience.  It may have everything to do with them practicing Safe Hex an not being thanks to software.

 

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8 minutes ago, David H. Lipman said:

There are lies, damn lies, statistics and there are benchmarks.  All can be skewed by an agenda.

 

"There are lies..." Let's hope that MBAM3.0 is not going to use your explanation and not participate in any of the traditional tests like AVComparatives or AV Test.

And why would you believe that AV Test would lie about .....MSE??? Is free.

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5 hours ago, AdvancedSetup said:

Reminder to all, please keep all discussions civil and non-threatening. Everyone is allowed their own opinion, just keep it friendly, please.

Thank you

 

What exactly do you see "non civil" and "threatening" in whatever has been discussed so far? 

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