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I want to learn how to program, but I don't know where to start


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School is a good start.  You already have the resources at your fingertips.

You have to have a good understanding of math.  Not complex math such as calculus or even trigonometry but understand the basics and understand them well.  You need to understand that there are different numbering systems such as Binary, Hexadecimal and Decimal.  Good mathematics is needed to understand how those numbers are manipulated.

The next thing to understand is exemplified by the word "flow".  Before one can program one has to visualize the flow of what is to happen.  One can make a diagram of this and that's a Flow Chart.  It describes the flow of the code.  What happens if there are decisions and menus, etc.  Once the flow is conceptualized and a physical or mental flow chart is created you can create what is called Pseudo Code.

Pseudo Code is fake code that uses verbiage that describes what is to be done.  Once you know a language, you turn that Pseudo Code into Language Code.

I congratulate you on your forward thinking.  I give you Kudos for not only expressing what you want to do but by asking questions.  Half the process of solving any problem is asking the right questions.

While you are in High School find a favourite teacher and/or a guidance counselor and express your desires.  They are there to guide and mentor you.  We will be happy to assist and help you in that as well.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flowchart

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudocode

https://optionalbits.com/learning-code-1-what-is-programming-f77872891a6d#.4v2irbmxi

http://www.whoishostingthis.com/blog/2014/09/04/learn-to-code/

http://www.programmerinterview.com/index.php/general-miscellaneous/whats-the-difference-between-a-compiled-and-an-interpreted-language/

 

Edited by David H. Lipman
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  • 2 months later...

They teach a very basic coding at age ten in the uk now my ten year old is making a game with his class mates, pretty young huh.

I like code academy. The first 3 languages I learnt where HTML, CSS and Python because they are well to me the easiest I learnt them buy taking code from the net and looking at it so I could see how things functioned. I then set my self goals of things I'd like to make but made them exciting to me.

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On 11/17/2016 at 1:52 PM, MHN39 said:

Hi!

My name is Michael. I'm a high-school student who wants to take an Introduction to Computer Science course next year, but I don't know anything about programming. Would any of you recommend https://www.codecademy.com/ as a place where I could learn how to program?

Thanks,

Michael

Hi Michael!

Depending on how tech savvy you are already, you might be perfectly ready to leap into the world of computer programming, and CodeCademy is a good place to start. I've done most of the JavaScript and HTML lessons there, just to brush up on best practices and see how much of it I already knew. It was fairly easy, and is explained well through their online course platform. I have yet to try any of their paid lessons yet though, so don't take this as an endorsement.

You might find that you love the programming side of code more so than the design aspect, and thus going to school for it like @David H. Lipman suggested provides great experience, if you can apply yourself to such a thing. Either taking a full fledged CompSci course with a focus on programming works, or even doing an 8 week code bootcamp, similar to what https://lighthouselabs.ca offers us on the West Coast of Canada.

Programming does require a lot more critical thinking and attention to higher level logic and math skils though, so keep that in mind. This is why I decided to focus on hardware and software configuration instead of carrying on with Computer Programming in high school. I enjoy working with my hands to create something or solve a problem for a client, so becoming an independent technician and frontend web developer made more sense for me since they don't require my brain cells to work so hard. :P But hey, if you've got the drive to program, go for it!

Any other questions, don't hesitate to ask!

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