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Windows Defender Real-Time Protection and Anti-Exploit Premium


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Two days ago I installed Anti Exploit Premium ver 1.08.1.2572 on a PC running Windows 10 Home, 64-bit 10.0, build 10586. I run Windows Defender on this computer, along with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Home Premium ver 2.2.1.1043.

This morning Windows Defender is reporting that its Real-Time Protection is turned off, and that I should turn it on. Did the install Anti Exploit Premium turn off Windows Defender Real-Time Protection?

And I guess  my bigger question is, what setting should I be using with these three applications? For example, should Windows Defender Real-Time Protection be turned off when Anti Exploit Premium is also running on a PC?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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@kc27, welcome to the Malwarebytes Forums!!
 

1 hour ago, kc27 said:

This morning Windows Defender is reporting that its Real-Time Protection is turned off, and that I should turn it on. Did the install Anti Exploit Premium turn off Windows Defender Real-Time Protection?

I can say for sure that Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit does not disable Windows Defender. It's possible that you have a pending Windows Defender Update or Windows Update that requires a reboot before protection can be re-enabled due to core Windows Defender system components being updated.

1 hour ago, kc27 said:

And I guess  my bigger question is, what setting should I be using with these three applications? For example, should Windows Defender Real-Time Protection be turned off when Anti Exploit Premium is also running on a PC?

Similar to Porthos, I also run that combo on three of my PCs and can confirm no conflicts too. They should all be enabled and running with their default protection settings.

The only setting you might want to change is the "Show System Tray Notification Tips" setting of Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit. Some users may find the notification toast that pops-up when a protected browser or application launches on Windows 10 to be a little annoying. Obviously that's your call to make as it's truly a personal preference type of thing.

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Thanks for the advice. I did as suggested and turned the Windows Defender real-time protection back on, rebooted, and it has remained on after the reboot, so all is well. Also, thanks for mentioning the "Show System Tray Notification Tips" setting. The announcements were just going to cause confusion for the elderly family member who uses this computer.

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3 hours ago, kc27 said:

Two days ago I installed Anti Exploit Premium ver 1.08.1.2572 on a PC running Windows 10 Home, 64-bit 10.0, build 10586. I run Windows Defender on this computer, along with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Home Premium ver 2.2.1.1043.

This morning Windows Defender is reporting that its Real-Time Protection is turned off, and that I should turn it on. Did the install Anti Exploit Premium turn off Windows Defender Real-Time Protection?

And I guess  my bigger question is, what setting should I be using with these three applications? For example, should Windows Defender Real-Time Protection be turned off when Anti Exploit Premium is also running on a PC?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

It shouldn't hurt to run these three together since they do not conflict each other. But if you keep all your software and OS up-to-date, then you don't really don't need anti-exploit at all because exploit is less common these day like 3% threat. You will runs into malware and ransomware more often than run into exploit.   

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I did not realize the anti-exploit threat was that low. The PC is used mostly by an elderly relative, but when family gathers at their home, many people use the PC, including teens who love to surf the web to who knows where. I thought this Anti Exploit software could help protect the PC from something that one of the non-regular users of this PC might encounter. It would save me from needing to do troubleshooting or having to restore an image.

Edited by kc27
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Hi, @kc27:

Adding the layer of at least MBAE Free to the elderly relative's computer would be a good idea.
It is free and, once installed, requires essentially no interaction from the user.  It runs silently in the background to help protect against the "how" of malware infection.
(Your AV and MBAM protect against the "what" of malware infection.)
Windows Defender on Win10 is probably as good as any other free AV; it has its fans and detractors.  It's probably the least hands-on of the popular AVs, which may be good for your elderly relative.
But supplementing it with anti-malware and anti-exploit protection would be a good idea.

Here are some resources to help you make up your mind:

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit in action

Exploits: How they work and how to crush them

MBAE FAQs

While we respect @SloppyMcFloppy's personal opinion about MBAE's not being needed, IMHO this layer of protection would be a good idea for your elderly relative.
(I do not work for Malwarebytes -- I am just a home user with paid licenses.)

Having said all of that, no one program or collection of programs can protect 100% of computers from 100% of malware 100% of the time.  The first and last line of computer defense is the part between the chair and the keyboard.  An MS-MVP and Malwarebytes Forum expert, @quietman7, has published several exhaustive articles about "best practices" HERE. You may find some of that information handy to plan your strategy.

I hope this helps,

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3 hours ago, daledoc1 said:

Hi, @kc27:

Adding the layer of at least MBAE Free to the elderly relative's computer would be a good idea.
It is free and, once installed, requires essentially no interaction from the user.  It runs silently in the background to help protect against the "how" of malware infection.
(Your AV and MBAM protect against the "what" of malware infection.)
Windows Defender on Win10 is probably as good as any other free AV; it has its fans and detractors.  It's probably the least hands-on of the popular AVs, which may be good for your elderly relative.
But supplementing it with anti-malware and anti-exploit protection would be a good idea.

Here are some resources to help you make up your mind:

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit in action

Exploits: How they work and how to crush them

MBAE FAQs

While we respect @SloppyMcFloppy's personal opinion about MBAE's not being needed, IMHO this layer of protection would be a good idea for your elderly relative.
(I do not work for Malwarebytes -- I am just a home user with paid licenses.)

Having said all of that, no one program or collection of programs can protect 100% of computers from 100% of malware 100% of the time.  The first and last line of computer defense is the part between the chair and the keyboard.  An MS-MVP and Malwarebytes Forum expert, @quietman7, has published several exhaustive articles about "best practices" HERE. You may find some of that information handy to plan your strategy.

I hope this helps,

I just skim through that articles link you posted and I have to say he posted lots of information that will answer majority people questions. But it too much reading that just make me want to go sleep on my keyboard. 

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Thanks for the links. It is true, the computer operator being the first and last line of defense. But when the computer is available to users who are minimally computer/www savvy, or young people who have not learned their way around the web yet, I am all for a program to help minimize or in the best case prevent any "damage"

 

Thanks again,,

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Hi:

14 minutes ago, kc27 said:

It is true, the computer operator being the first and last line of defense. But when the computer is available to users who are minimally computer/www savvy, or young people who have not learned their way around the web yet, I am all for a program to help minimize or in the best case prevent any "damage"

I agree 110%.:)

If there were not a bonafide need for high-quality security software, Malwarebytes and every other similar company would have long gone belly-up.

I merely mentioned the "caveat" to manage expectations, especially for those who might stumble upon this thread.  There are folks out there who think that an anti-virus or anti-malware program will protect them 100% from themselves, when they engage in unsafe hex.:lol:

Thanks for your support.

Cheers,

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20 minutes ago, kc27 said:

Thanks for the links. It is true, the computer operator being the first and last line of defense. But when the computer is available to users who are minimally computer/www savvy, or young people who have not learned their way around the web yet, I am all for a program to help minimize or in the best case prevent any "damage"

 

Thanks again,,

More importantly, Every computer should have an IMAGE backup to an EXTERNAL Drive at least monthly.

All it costs is a drive $50-70 USD and the willingness to run a backup each month minimum.

My go to choice is Macrium Reflect Free.

http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

 

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