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Flying over Alaska


AdvancedSetup
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On 3/30/2016 at 6:14 PM, AdvancedSetup said:

I guess the US bought Alaska from Russia on this day (March 30, 1867) 149 years ago, for $7.2 million dollars. About 2 cents per acre. Was admitted as the 49th state of the U.S. on January 3, 1959

 

I don't know what that works out to in 2016 dollars, but it seems as if it was a good deal.

Give me a harness and parachute and I'll do the pontoon ride!

{{Ron, that's one of your photos from your Alaska trip, is it not??? AMAZING}}

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19 minutes ago, daledoc1 said:

I don't know what that works out to in 2016 dollars, but it seems as if it was a good deal.

Google that up.. Some say it was not a good deal as the State has never earned its way and has cost the US in support dollars, so they say. Some say in today's dollars it's worth about $115 million dollars. Still not bad considering a single home here in the rich area of California can go for $20 million.

Give me a harness and parachute and I'll do the pontoon ride!

If you have the parachute - no harness needed:  :P

{{Ron, that's one of your photos from your Alaska trip, is it not??? AMAZING}}

Yes, from my trip to Alaska - loved it. Very beautiful country up there. We actually landed on the big lake in the picture.

 

 

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17 hours ago, AdvancedSetup said:

Mountains don't look as tall but beautiful country :D

Yepp probably, highest in that area of Norway (Lofoten) is 1262m but we have lots of them

You may come visit  ^_^

https://www.google.no/search?q=Lofotens&rlz=1C1GGGE_noNO672NO672&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=955&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjng4DCzPLLAhXGFiwKHXimCG4Q_AUIBigB#imgrc=fio2j-EJ4-lLRM%3A

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I think it is because the Alaskan Mountains are a younger chain being on the boundary of the Pacific ( Juan de Fuco Plate ) and North American tectonic plates in the Northern Latitudes of the Ring of Fire.  They are still actively being lifted by plate subduction.  Norway is however on a much older Mountain range on the Eurasian Plate but also in the Northern Latitudes.  Thus Norway has experienced a greater level of glaciation and erosion, rounding and lowering their mountain peeks.  At the same time providing the stunning Norwegian Fjords that make that country so picturesque and beautiful.

 

Mount McKinley no more...  We now give praise and salute the Aleut people and Mount Denali, Alaska.

31DENALI-superJumbo.jpg

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I believe that is due to the Gulf Stream.  An Ocean Current that is born at the equator and the Caribbean and travels up along the Eastern US, Labrador Canada and Greenland branching North into the Norwegian Current.  Is part of a greater system known as the Ocean Conveyor that brings equatorial energy into Northern Latitudes. 

Water has great strength and is shown in Hydrostatic, Hydraulic and Crystalline forces.  Sea salinity interplays with the Hydrostatic force by changing water density.  Cold Saline sinks while Warm Fresh rises which creates these conveyors and thus the transfer of energy from the equator to the poles.  Scientists are worried about climatic changes because the ice stored in the poles is shrinking.  This is fresh water and thus is changing the salinity of the oceans as well as effecting these ocean currents.  There are some circles in climatology that believe that if too much fresh water is released into the oceans these currents will change and the North Atlantic conveyor bringing equatorial energy to Northern Europe can be dramatically altered making Western Europe much colder.

References:
http://science1.nasa.gov/earth-science/oceanography/physical-ocean/salinity/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream
https://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/investigations/es2403/es2403page04.cfm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Atlantic_Current
http://phys.org/news/2011-04-fresh-arctic-shift-gulf-stream.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Atlantic_Gyre

 

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2 hours ago, Mark said:

One amazing fact about Northern Norway is the mild weather, considering the high latitude. Sea temperature/currents take care of it. Would love to visit one day.

At the coast yes but inland it is very different. Karasjok has the Norwegian record -51.4C   below -30C is normal winter temp there   brrrrrr

 

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16 hours ago, pondus said:

At the coast yes but inland it is very different. Karasjok has the Norwegian record -51.4C   below -30C is normal winter temp there   brrrrrr

 

Actually that isn't so bad ;)

I'm at about 48° latitude, far away from big open water and our absolute low stands at -49,5C and we get quite a few -30Cs and below in the mornings (mid December to late Feb). The warm waters effect air masses for quite a distance, but there's nothing like warm water close by (coast) to keep you warm.

The record low for Canada seems to have taken place in a little place called Snag, in the Yukon, sitting at *only* 62° latitude. haha, with a -63C (that's -81F folks). >>BRRRrrrrrr...

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