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UI Changes for Malwarebytes 2.1


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Overall a better, cleaner look.

 

Gotta agree with others, the smiley is unnecessary and not too professional looking.

 

And the fonts are really too small on my FHD laptop and on my 24" 1920 x 1200 monitor.

 

That said, as long as Mlwarebytes still does its superb job of protecting my computers I would keep using it if the GUI was circus colors and clown faces.

 

So thanks for the great work.

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Seeing as the world and even Microsoft has concluded that Windows 8 was an unmitigated disaster, I'm both surprised and disappointed to learn that MalwareBytes has adopted that flat Windows 8 look. Fewer colors is one thing. Moving towards Windows 8's look is another.

 

A big Thumbs Down from this user :-(

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Happy to see the ad banner at the bottom of the GUI is gone but hate the smiley face - it makes the GUI look like it was designed for a 5-year-old.  Please bring back the old green checkmark.

My only real issue with the current v. 2.0.3 GUI is that I have difficulty seeing the grey text and icons in the top toolbar (Dashboard / Scan / Settings / History).  Unselected (greyed-out) toolbar buttons are almost impossible to see against the black banner unless the screen of my laptop is set to a perfect 90 degree angle to the keyboard.

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Just upgraded to 2.0.3 from an older version. The new UI looks awful! Why do you need a bloated dashboard that uses a huge amount of screen real-estate to show nearly no useful information?!?

 

Well, well, I can live with the UI as long as I rarely have to use it. However, what I can't live with is that the ability to adjust the "advanced" setting of not starting MBAM with windows. Looks like I have to install/unstall MBAM everytime I need to scan.

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The way I feel about the GUI is if the program is running as it should then my interaction with it would be limited to the installation, initial settings, occasional on demand scans and if there is a problem. Basically I don't want to see the GUI I want it to sit down there in the system tray and just do it's job which is to tell me it started, updated or found a problem. I don't want  to watch it work. I don't want to keep messing with it. I have better things to look at and do.

 

To me, what's not seen is more important then what is seen. For example I really can't remember the last time I had to look at my Eset Smart Security GUI. Updates notify me with a small pop up and fades away. If it finds something then a bigger popup occurs and I deal with it straight away at the pop up. I see the start up logo at boot, my choice, I kind of like that idea, sort of reassuring me that it's there.

 

Providing that you are practicing smart and safe Internet policies, the better the security software runs the less you see of it in my opinion.

 

So in the end my request of Malwarebytes is to pay attention to what's running in my tray and behind the scenes this should be the number one priority. Not the smiley face, colors or anything else for that matter. No, I don't care what the tray icon looks like either.

To me I think the opposite. A lot of people want a security suite that does the work for them but the problem is I find these are the people more likely to get infected. It's good if it does stuff automatically but people tend to get lazy. I like to regularly go into my settings and have a look and run things manually to so I know I'm not just relying on the automatic stuff.

 

As to the design itself, I really like it. Malwarebytes had a good simple design before version 2 but it was very simple and as mentioned it didn't really feel modern - while some may like this some people may think an old looking program may have old looking protection. 2.0 and upwards had an okay design but it wasn't as sleek as the upcoming design looks. It seems to flow a lot better especially without the extra stuff on the bottom. I'd probably replace the smiley face with a tick as most have suggested as that seems standard practise with all security programs

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same for me, please no smiliey and or other childish elements.

 

was a bit suprised about mbam homepage with the "robots". we recommend mbam beside adwcleaner to clean up systems in a professional way. teh bussines part is the way i would prefer - no chichi - simple symbols to recognize.

 

nevertheless almost lot of sofftware now goes windows 8 tiles - clean and straight.

 

btw as mentioned - someone should revise the german ui - still major bugs

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To me I think the opposite. A lot of people want a security suite that does the work for them but the problem is I find these are the people more likely to get infected. It's good if it does stuff automatically but people tend to get lazy. I like to regularly go into my settings and have a look and run things manually to so I know I'm not just relying on the automatic stuff.

 

As to the design itself, I really like it. Malwarebytes had a good simple design before version 2 but it was very simple and as mentioned it didn't really feel modern - while some may like this some people may think an old looking program may have old looking protection. 2.0 and upwards had an okay design but it wasn't as sleek as the upcoming design looks. It seems to flow a lot better especially without the extra stuff on the bottom. I'd probably replace the smiley face with a tick as most have suggested as that seems standard practise with all security programs

I can assure you that I am as far from lazy when it comes to the security of my computer as you are assuming that I am. I am very proactive when it comes to the security of my system.  My point was that if the software is running as it should then the interaction with the UI would be limited.

 

If it doesn't work as it should and I have to keep checking on it to be sure it's working as designed then I don't trust the software and I would be rid of it. Please read my last paragraph again, it's most important to me that Malwarebytes puts it's main priority on the operation of the program not what it looks like.

 

I do believe that if there is an issue with the operation of Malwarebytes short of a complete crash it would let you know either through the tray icon or a pop up. If I am wrong on this someone please let me know.

 

To each their own if you feel insecure with a particular product then check on it. I honestly do not believe that Malwarebytes would design a product with automatic scheduling of updates and scans as well as web protection if they wanted you to regularly check on it to see if it's working. If that were the case by the time you check on it and discover that it's not working as designed it's probably to late.I also doubt that Malwarebytes would be in business very long if their product was so inferior that you had to regularly check to see if the program is operating correctly.

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http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-ui-of-the-future-three-takeaways-from-apple-pioneer-bill-fernandez/

 

 

"We are in a time of transition," said Fernandez. "And like [how] the water becomes brackish where river water meets the ocean, the state of UI design is messy. There's some great stuff out there, much more than there used to be, but there's still a lot of trash, and there's a lot of well-meaning but misguided efforts. One example of this is in the migration from three-dimensional, photo-realistic UI elements (window frames, pushbuttons, sliders, etc.) to 'flat' UI design. Years ago a friend asked what I thought web pages of the future would be like and I said 'like magazines.' I thought we'd see flatter designs, expert typography, beautiful, magazine-advertisement-like page layouts, etc. That prediction is coming true...

"But in moving towards flat design we are losing much of the wisdom that was embedded in the old 3D style of UI. For example: A user must be able to glance at a screen and know what is an interactive element (e.g., a button or link) and what is not (e.g., a label or motto); A user must be able to tell at a glance what an interactive element does (does it initiate a process, link to another page, download a document, etc.?); The UI should be explorable, discoverable, and self-explanatory. But many apps and websites, in the interest of a clean, spartan visual appearance, leave important UI controls hidden until the mouse hovers over just the right area or the app is in just the right state. This leaves the user in the dark, often frustrated and disempowered."

 

{{YES, under-the-hood functionality is more important than appearance.  And, YES, most users don't need to look at the GUI very often.  And, YES, no single design will please all users.  And, YES, a return to the MBAM 1.x GUI is not an option. But form and function are related.  If the original 2.0 GUI was too bold/colorful/busy/garish/obtrusive, then one might ask if the proposed new GUI for 2.1 might over-correct too far in the opposite direction.}}

{{As for the smileys, the tally of forum member comments speaks for itself.}}

 

Thanks for listening and for all the hard work to produce the best anti-malware program.

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  • 3 weeks later...

POSITIVELY AWFUL:

Smiley faces -- is this a child's game or a white-hat security application?  (Sorry, but playful and silly are not attributes I seek in a serious security program.)

 

Just wanted to make a statement on this comment.

 

As stated before, most users who use this program are computer novice users. The smiley face is just there to reassure the users that their computer is protected from malware. T "playful" and "silly" attribute can help brighten up the atmosphere.

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