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Right when I'm going off my computer to leave somewhere...


Guest masterblokz
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Guest masterblokz

1 out of 90 updates installed

please do not power off or unplug your computer

>90

>power off/unplug

now I have to watch it and make sure to wait until it finishes so I can unplug the battery

:rolleyes:

 

Am I the only one who gets annoyed by this.. lol

 

I know updates are important tho :lol:

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solution ...

make the updates and such items so that you can manually choose what happens and when .

i have done this on my machines many for years .

i do not like stuff happening that bogs a machine down when i am working with it .

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Solution; open the Run dialog, and type in the following:

shutdown /s /t 0
Then click the 'OK' button.

That shuts it down right away, without running the update install. Of course, you have to do it before you click the Shutdown button, otherwise you have to wait for those updates.

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Guest masterblokz

Yeah I know, I just noticed windows update was not on. :o

I'm fine with it installing updates, but I need to wait for it to finish and then I can unplug the computer, so it doesn't keep charging.

Otherwise if I unplug during the installing, I don't know how much power's left.

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Solution; open the Run dialog, and type in the following:

shutdown /s /t 0
Yeah I have two shortcuts on my desktop that I made for this, one to shutdown and one to restart the computer....

 

for shutdown....C:\WINDOWS\system32\shutdown.exe -s -t 01 for restart....C:\WINDOWS\system32\shutdown.exe -r -t 01
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Yeah I know, I just noticed windows update was not on. :o

I'm fine with it installing updates, but I need to wait for it to finish and then I can unplug the computer, so it doesn't keep charging.

Otherwise if I unplug during the installing, I don't know how much power's left.

 

Don't unplug it.  A notebook can always be connected to its power supply.  The electronics are designed for the concept of having an AC Power supply connected to it with a battery 100% charged in an; "on" state, "off" state or "sleep" state.

 

It's not any different with a notebook on a docking station.

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Relatively speaking no.

 

We'll compare two states.  20% battery state and 100% battery state.

{ I will leave out of this discussion the AC/DC power conversion losses which are low }

 

20% battery:

The total power consumed will be the notebook's consumption (the sum of the motherboard, display and hard disk) plus the battery charging consumption.

 

100% battery:

The total power consumed will be the notebook's consumption (the sum of the motherboard, display and hard disk).

The amount of power provided to the battery will be so minimal that it can be left out of the discussion.

 

If the Energy Star inactivity time-out is reached the display will turn off and the power consumption will be the sum of only the motherboard and hard disk.

 

As I previously stated...

"The electronics are designed for the concept of having an AC Power supply connected to it with a battery 100% charged in an; "on" state, "off" state or "sleep" state."

 

A notebook battery is never 1overcharged as the DC Charging Regulation circuitry incorporated in the notebook design will mitigate that from happening.

 

Thus it isn't a valid argument.

 

----

 

1.  Of course this is negated IFF the DC Charging Regulation circuitry goes bad.  This is very rare but it is possible.

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to add to what dhl said ...

the conversion factor of the modern swmps (switch mode power supply) is very good in and of itself ... 90%+ is the norm .

switch mode supplies are quite unlike their "linear regulator" brethren that dissipate excess energy as waste heat to do their job .

the amount of "waste heat/energy" consumed or produced by a swmps is minimal ; as the circuit being powered (or battery being charged) requires less current the swmps will "track" much more closely than a linear regulator ... proportionality and efficiency being the key words .

when there is "no load" on a switch mode supply it will "fold back" , some do this to the point of being comatose , consuming only a few milliwatts (a milliwatt = 1/1000 watt) .

 

sooo ... leave the outboard power supply (aka : swmps) hooked up ...

when the battery is topped off and the comp no longer needs (relatively) massive amounts of power , the swmps will simply fold back and consume but very little idle/standby power .

i have calculated (roughly) that leaving my supply hooked up to my laptop 24/7 for a year will cost me less than one USD over unplugging it .

the resultant PITA problems of extra wear on connectors and wire , dead or partially charged battery , problems resulting from a comp "dieing" during updates , etc , cost far more than this amount .

 

google terms :

switch mode power supply design

linear regulator circuit design

(also idle current and efficiency of the above)

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