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Andy2013

Adobe ARM

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Is it really necessary for Adobe ARM to launch at start up? All adobe programs by default search for updates and apply them automatically. Disabling ARM with CCleaner is simple, but at the next adobe update ARM is active again. Seems a little invasive to me?

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Is it really necessary for Adobe ARM to launch at start up? All adobe programs by default search for updates and apply them automatically. Disabling ARM with CCleaner is simple, but at the next adobe update ARM is active again. Seems a little invasive to me?

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Adobe ARM is the Adobe update manager for Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat.

 

Making sure they are updated is important since PDF files are so often used in the vulnerability/exploitation vector that making sure you have a current version is an important step to mitigate exploitation.  Thus it is a startup item (and service).

 

If you are extremely attentive to manual updates then it can be removed.  If however if you are not, it should be left alone.

 

HTH

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Hi, Andy2013: :)

 

Welcome.

 

I don't think it's necessary (one of the more expert members will correct me, if I'm wrong).

 

Why not just go into msconfig and delete it from the startup list?

That ought to "stick" better, rather than using CCleaner.

(A better choice than CCleaner for this sort of customization of programs loading at startup might be Startup Lite, or Winpatrol Plus.)

 

OTOH, since Adobe does experience frequent security vulnerabilities with their software, if you're going to disable auto-updating, then it would be important to manually check often and/or to track their security patches, e.g. >>HERE<<.

 

HTH,

 

daledoc1

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I fully agree with David on this. I always disable it, however I check at least once a week for updates for all of my Adobe products as well as Windows Update and other critical internet facing applications.

I remove it via Autoruns and it's always proven successful. I've not tried using CCleaner to disable it, but I suspect it fails because I believe Adobe ARM uses a service in addition to a RUN key, which is why it comes back if you just disable the RUN entry with CCleaner (CCleaner does not handle services or drivers).

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Adobe ARM is the Adobe update manager for Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat.

 

Making sure they are updated is important since PDF files are so often used in the vulnerability/exploitation vector that making sure you have a current version is an important step to mitigate exploitation.  Thus it is a startup item (and service).

 

If you are extremely attentive to manual updates then it can be removed.  If however you are not, it should be left alone.

 

HTH

Having read through all the responses (Thanks) I decided to disarm it for one month, and manually update from the link provided by daledoc1. If no issues arise I will continue the practice.

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If you want to further ensure that you're safe from outdated/unpatched software vulnerabilities (including those for which there currently exist not patches from Adobe), you might consider checking out our latest product, Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit. It's currently in beta and you can use it for free for the time being. More info about this new weapon against malware can be found here and a quick writeup about it on CNET here.

If you're a Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Pro user, it runs just fine alongside Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and should also work seamlessly with your antivirus and other security applications, though I recommend reading this post to verify that you're not running any applications known to have compatibility problems with it.

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Having read through all the responses (Thanks) I decided to disarm it for one month, and manually update from the link provided by daledoc1. If no issues arise I will continue the practice.

 

Hi, andy2013:

 

Just to clarify: that's not really an "update link" -- it's really just the Adobe security blog.

While it's a good way to keep track of their security patches for all their software, you'll still need to follow whatever advice is provided there in order to manually update all the Adobe software.

FYI, Adobe recently moved to a monthly ROUTINE update schedule on the same Patch Tuesday (2nd Tuesday of the month) as Microsoft.

However, important/critical, unscheduled SECURITY patches can be released at any time, as the need arises for the all-too-common vulnerabilities.

So, if you do disable the auto-updater, it's REALLY important -- as both DHL and exile360 expertly pointed out -- to stay on top of things. :)

 

(There are also many reputable security blogs/newsletters/ezines that offer free email subscriptions and other means of being kept abreast of these sorts of things. And you might want to watch these forum sub-sections here: Security Software Updates and General Software Updates and Security Alerts)

 

Cheers!

 

daledoc1

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If you want to further ensure that you're safe from outdated/unpatched software vulnerabilities (including those for which there currently exist not patches from Adobe), you might consider checking out our latest product, Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit. It's currently in beta and you can use it for free for the time being. More info about this new weapon against malware can be found here and a quick writeup about it on CNET here.

If you're a Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Pro user, it runs just fine alongside Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and should also work seamlessly with your antivirus and other security applications, though I recommend reading this post to verify that you're not running any applications known to have compatibility problems with it.

 

Even better! ;)

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Hi, andy2013:

 

Just to clarify: that's not really an "update link" -- it's really just the Adobe security blog.

While it's a good way to keep track of their security patches for all their software, you'll still need to follow whatever advice is provided there in order to manually update all the Adobe software.

FYI, Adobe recently moved to a monthly ROUTINE update schedule on the same Patch Tuesday (2nd Tuesday of the month) as Microsoft.

However, important/critical, unscheduled SECURITY patches can be released at any time, as the need arises for the all-too-common vulnerabilities.

So, if you do disable the auto-updater, it's REALLY important -- as both DHL and exile360 expertly pointed out -- to stay on top of things. :)

 

(There are also many reputable security blogs/newsletters/ezines that offer free email subscriptions and other means of being kept abreast of these sorts of things. And you might want to watch these forum sub-sections here: Security Software Updates and General Software Updates and Security Alerts)

 

Cheers!

 

daledoc1

Yes, I just updated to 11.7 and will diligently monitor their security postings. I also just installed the Beta version of Anti-Exploit, as suggested by exile360. Thanks to both of you for the solid advice.

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Yes, I just updated to 11.7

 

11.7?

That sounds like Adobe Flash Player, rather than Reader/Acrobat/Creative Suite?

 

If so, I could be wrong, but I don't think ARM handles Flash Player (or Shockwave Player).

(The Adobe security blog DOES post about SECURITY updates to both of these, but I don't think ARM updates the browser plug-ins?)

 

To find out what versions  of Flash Player are on your system, you can visit this link: Flash Player Help/Find Version

NOTE: There are different versions of Flash Player for different browsers, and each needs to be separately updated. So, you'll want to check that site with each of your web browsers.

 

There are several ways to update Flash Player, but I personally prefer to manually download and run the offline installers from here: Adobe Flash Player Distribution (corrected this link; sorry!)

You may find it easier to get it online here: Adobe Flash Player.

(Checking for updates can also be done through the Plug-In checkers within the browser, such as Firefox, but these are notoriously unreliable.)

>>>Just remember that you need to update it for each of the browsers you use! :)

 

Cheers!

 

daledoc1

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