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12 obsolete technologies Americans still use


mountaintree16
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My grandpa has an old laptop with Windows 98 on it and still uses it for his book writing. Although not much anymore as it's hooked up to an old monitor in the basement and I don't think they go down there much anymore as they are up there in years.

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I don't use any of those myself, but many businesses, government agencies and medical facilities still require faxed copies of things and will not accept digital (email etc.) under any circumstances. I don't have a fax myself, but I have been forced to borrow the fax at the hotel I used to work at for exactly this reason.

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I find the article rather elitist and stupid.

They balk at land lines. F**k cell phones. Dial-Up Networking - If you live in rural America Cellular Broadband, FiOS, Cable and DSL are not always available leaving DUN a viable option and that interplays with cells phones or the lack of service thereof.

Dot Matrix Printers can handle pin-feed paper used in pre-printed forms ensuring correct alignment with many forms being carbonless creating a business and consumer copy of what's printed. It is tried and true technology that exists because it works best. Impact printing is here to stay.

These technologies are far from "outdated".

BTW: I still regularly use Quicken 8 for DOS [circa 1998] and prefer its simplistic textual register interface to a Windows GUI. As long as I use a Win32 based OS I can still use it in Win32's DOS Emulation (not available in Win64).

Sometimes older technology is actually better that newer technology. In fact Superstorm Sandy proved this. While cell service was out, important gov't service related information was reliably transmitted and received over AM Radio.

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"Sometimes older technology is actually better that newer technology. In fact Superstorm Sandy proved this. While cell service was out, important gov't service related information was reliably transmitted and received over AM Radio"

what ?! no hams pounding brass ?

(CW/morse code)

:lol:

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I built a computer a few years ago to specifically run Windows 3.11 WFW for some testing. There were some good ideas and methods in the old software. Wasn't bugged about are you sure messages much back then.

Yeah, I think that's definitely a good thing for most though, as these days (and in fact for over a decade now) more and more of the people using computers did so because they 'had to' (e.g. for work, school etc.), not because they wanted to, so they required handholding so they didn't screw anything up that they themselves might not be able to figure out how to fix/change back.

Today I believe it's a different story. Most choose to use computers, but all too many still don't really know how to use them, or at least not down to any real technical level, so a bit of handholding is still frequently required. As an example, consider how many angry customers MS would have if they simply eliminated the default 'are you sure?' dialog from emptying the recycle bin. For those of us (such as myself) who get annoyed at this messaging, we can simply disable it because we know how and know to look for such an option in general; but for a fairly uneducated PC user, it might be a catastrophe for them to delete something unintentionally and without a way back by default and no warning about it.

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  • Root Admin

That's a single "are you sure" which is okay. The ones that are annoying as an example are deleting a folder and it asks you maybe upwards of 5 times are you sure - depending on what file types are in that folder.

RD /Q /S from DOS doesn't ask a thing it just does it :-)

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I still use some of that stuff... IE fax machine and older operating systems....

Heck, you may not believe this but I own two pay phones and they still make quite a bit of money too.... its all a matter of having them placed in a good spot where they can get some use...

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The decline of the availability of public payphones, in most urban areas, was in a response to the so-called war on drugs as they were used by street level dealers.

 

The use of Cell Phones did reduce that availability even further.  Now they are a rarity and are relegated to mostly public transportation hubs (rail, air, boat, etc).

 

I still remember the old phone booths found in diners and drug stores.  Many were stylish wooden booths that had a certain aesthetic appeal.  Now you can only see them in old movies, museums and in the hands of collectors.

 

phone_booth.png

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