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Google Chrome=No Antivirus needed?


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Not sure if I placed this in the right part of the forum. Sorry if I didn't.

My friend says that he doesn't need an AV because he is using Google Chrome, therefore he can't be infected by anything. He also says that an AV is not necessary because he has never been infected, so why would he need one?

I don't have much knowledge about this stuff. Could anyone please clarify his statements? Are they true or not?

Thanks!

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Absolutely WRONG.

One needs anti virus just because they are hooked to the Internet and that's not all because someone could have an infected thumb drive and connect it to a PC and infect that PC. Take the Lovsan/Blaster worm that used an exploit of a vulnerability in the RPC/RPCSS module of the OS and infected vulnerable computers just by being connected to the Internet without the protection of a Firewall. One could get a CDROM that has malware on it and when they install a malicious application or utility the person can be infected.

It doesn't matter what Browser one uses. The results are the same. One needs to have a fully installed anti virus application that performs "On Access" and "On Demand" scanning.

Suggestions: Eset NOD32, Kaspersky, Avira, Avast and Microsoft security Essentials.

I'm glad that your friend hasn't been infected. Maybe he practices Safe Hex and thus his actions have prevented him from getting infected. However, how does he REALLY know for sure ?

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Nope. Not really. In a recent test Chrome was hacked in five minutes. It also suffers from the most number of vulnerabilities than any other Browser.

Then there is a whole different angle of security. Google can not be trusted. Chrome is nothing but a Google data mining application to increase the data Google uses to profit from.

EDIT:

Example: Google Releases Chrome 17.0.963.79

Google Releases Chrome 17.0.963.79

added March 12, 2012 at 11:07 am

Google has released Chrome 17.0.963.79 for Linux, Macintosh, Windows, and Google Chrome Frame to address multiple vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities may allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial-of-service condition.

US-CERT encourages users and administrators to review the Google Chrome Releases blog entry and update to Chrome 17.0.963.79.

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Nearly all security professionals will tell you that any browser has vulnerabilities. Chrome was the first to be exploited in the most recent tests. That does not mean that it is not safe, just that none are completely safe regardless of sandbox.

Not to disrespect him but i believe that your friend is underinformed regarding web security.

One's browsing habits play a huge part in safety.

Personally i use MBAM pro and MSE together with Firefox and noscript as my security suite and would bet money that it is much safer than Chrome alone.

Oops, sorry, edited to add that i very much recommend that you take David's advice.

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Guest Seagull

I agree 110% with David. Just because Google Chrome sandboxes extensions and other plugins doesn't mean its invincible, as long as your connected to the internet your always at risk.

You should always use a Anti-Virus if your connected to the internet, especially on a broadband connection.

That being said, I personally use Google Chrome and I find it be a great browser, but using a certain browser is all about a matter of preference. I have used Internet Explorer, Firefox and Opera, and I find Google Chrome suits my needs the best. It has a basic/bland interface which I like most about it, and its fast.

As for Google can't be trusted, I disagree. I been using Google as my main search engine for years and using some of there other services, (YouTube, Gmail) and I never felt or had my privacy violated in any way, I never got any spam. Thats just my two cents.

But in reality, no browser is considered safe. As long as your online and connected to the internet you are always at risk. The best security practice you can implement is "Using Common Sense" on the internet. Thats just my opinion.

I hope this helps. :)

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"My friend says that he doesn't need an AV because he is using Google Chrome, therefore he can't be infected by anything. He also says that an AV is not necessary because he has never been infected, so why would he need one?"

oooohhhh maaaannn ! :rolleyes:<_< (where the heck is the face-palm ?)

if your friend is accurate in his statement (but he could have an infection he is not aware of) he better go play the lottery .

point blank ... my personal opinion is that your friend is no where near as knowledgeable (aka : hip , slick and cool) as he professes to be .

i have seen many machines screwed up because of "friends" like him .

it is said that "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing" , your friend has a ways to go on the learning curve , just as all of us do ...

all of us are at different places on the path of learning .

you are doing the right thing by checking/seeking/looking for the truths ... and this is one place to find them .

again , personally speaking only , i would keep your friend away from your machine and avoid discourse with him about such matters .

@ david : "safe hex" ...

:lol:

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WOW. I just laughed at the title. That's way off. Not owning a computer is the only way you will never be infected. As long as you are connected to the internet or even own a computer you still can be infected. Whether it be drive by downloads or autorun infections from a removable device(flash drive, cd etc) there's always a risk of infection.

@Seagull

Take a look at Google's Terms of Use. Any content you share with them automatically becomes theirs and full access to do what they please with it.

Under the Your Content in our services section second paragraph. This is illegal and unethical practice.

http://www.google.co...policies/terms/

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"My friend says that he doesn't need an AV because he is using Google Chrome, therefore he can't be infected by anything. He also says that an AV is not necessary because he has never been infected, so why would he need one?"

oooohhhh maaaannn ! :rolleyes:<_< (where the heck is the face-palm ?)

@ david : "safe hex" ...

:lol:

You never heard of Safe Hex ?

We coined that term in Usenet years ago as you'll see in the above link.

where the heck is the face-palm ? Here --> OMG.gif

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yep dave , i first heard the term many years ago .

i have not heard it in some time though .

more related to the issue of this thread ...

i am glad you brought up the points about GC and google data-mining .

i have a friend who's daughter installed GC on his comp . i have warned him about using it and to stick with FF .

the reason ? he does handle what i would call "sensitive files/data" from time to time . and as we all know , there is a level of responsibility involved with this .

/methinks i will show him this thread

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Guest Seagull

Just my opinion but I personally think people on here are acting Google is the devil or something. If Google is so bad I guess alot people who use cell phones, Android in particular, better start throwing there phones away since Google is on ALOT of mobile devices now a days.

Google is just about everywhere. Like I said, I been using Google for about 7 years now and I never had any issues, Its a great search engine and some of there other services are good too. Infact the Android market, where you download Apps, was now replaced with the Google store on cell phones.

Just about any phone you get now a days will of some sort of Google app on it. Heck I even use there DNS servers and had no issues.

Well I think I strayed too far from the Topic now, my apologies.

Anyways, Semyazinovich1, I hope everything worked out for you, Good Luck. :)

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Google isn't 'evil' in my opinion, they simply track their users' browsing/search/email habits/content (yes, they read your email, though only to find keywords) all with the purpose of data-mining to implement profitable things like targeted advertisements. They aren't the only ones, Microsoft and Yahoo! do the same. Technically speaking, it is very similar to the behavior observed in ad-ware and spyware, though it isn't the excessively bad kind, like keyloggers which are used for identity theft and fraud.

It personally makes ME uncomfortable, but I do not consider it to be 'evil', it's simply the cost of using their services (they have to pay for the upkeep to the services they provide free of charge somehow ;)).

Now, back on topic. Yes, you should always use an antivirus. Basically all internet facing applications, such as internet browsers and the add-ons/plugins they use are going to have some sort of exploitable vulnerabilities. Even if such vulnerabilities are rare and seldom exploited, it's better to be safe than sorry, especially if you ever keep or use any sensitive info on your computer, like passwords, credit card numbers, online banking, online bill payments, PayPal etc. etc.

If system performance impact is an issue for you, then I'd recommend testing out a few different antiviruses to find one that is light on resources as there are plenty available, both free and paid so you can try them and see what works best for you. In addition to that, I do of course highly recommend Malwarebytes Anti-Malware PRO (I know, I know, I'm biased because I'm an employee). But the truth is, our researchers and developers are very good at what they do and we're backed by an excellent community of widely regarded security experts who assist us by providing live malware samples that they find in the wild so that we can analyze and add detection for them.

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If system performance impact is an issue for you, then I'd recommend testing out a few different antiviruses to find one that is light on resources as there are plenty available, both free and paid so you can try them and see what works best for you.

just to add to that only test 1 at a time and when ready to remove one and try another check and see if the company who made the anti virus has a removal tool because sometimes add and remove programs thats built into windows just doesnt remove everything to do with the anti virus

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