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exile360

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Everything posted by exile360

  1. By the way, you can also check the status of your licenses and activations by signing into My.Malwarebytes.com and you may create an account there if you haven't already and you should be able to track your licenses, installations and activations there. You can find out more in this support article.
  2. Greetings, As I understand it (and I believe this also applies to virtual machines and the like), using the license on the second operating system does count as a separate system/installation, however if you wish you may contact Malwarebytes Support directly via one of the options on this page to get a definitive answer if no one from the staff responds here, however based on what I've read and heard in the past, I do believe this is how it works. Please let us know if there is anything else we might assist you with. Thanks
  3. Greetings, Thanks for the suggestion. I will submit it to the team for review. In the meantime, if you haven't already, you may review the information in the Malwarebytes Cloud Console Administrator Guide found here (it is in PDF format so you'll require a PDF viewer such as Adobe Reader etc. to be able to view it). Please let us know if you have any further suggestions, feedback or problems with the software. Thanks
  4. By the way, I just wanted to confirm something. Could you please try uninstalling Avast temporarily, then reboot, then test to see of Lockbox works properly or not with Malwarebytes fully enabled? Also, while I'm not certain that it will help, a new beta has been released for Malwarebytes that includes some changes to the Web Protection component. Please enable beta updates under the Settings>Application tab in Malwarebytes and then scroll back up near the top of the same tab and click on the Install Application Updates button and allow Malwarebytes to install the beta version if it is not installed already (you can tell by checking under Settings>About where it should show 3.6.1.2711 for the Malwarebytes version and 1.0.495 for the Component package version). Please let me know how it goes and if the issue still persists with Avast removed and with the new beta version of Malwarebytes installed. Thanks
  5. Greetings, I did submit this thread and info to the team for review and analysis but I haven't heard anything back yet so unfortunately I don't have any new info on this issue at the moment, but I will ask again to see if anything has been discovered or verified yet on their end and will post back here as soon as I hear anything. Thank you for your continued patience, and hopefully we'll have some new info for you soon.
  6. Greetings, I'm sorry that you're having trouble with the software, but hopefully we'll be able to get it back up and running again for you. First off, I did see some odd entries in your logs with regards to the uninstall routine, so please do the following so that I can take a look at what happens when you try performing a clean uninstall without attempting to reinstall the software: Download and run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Clean button, and allow it to restart your system and then do not reinstall Malwarebytes, making sure to tell the tool not to download/install it for you Once that's done, please provide a fresh set of logs so that we can take a look and make sure that everything got removed properly this time: Run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Gather Logs button, and once it completes, attach the zip file it creates on your desktop to your next reply Thanks
  7. Yes, unfortunately that's likely due to the fact that XP Pro x64 isn't a supported platform so the QA team didn't test with it and the Dev team didn't code for it (or code in any special compatibility checking/notification routines). That said, it should still be possible to reinstall the older version if you wish. Just go to a site such as filehippo.com and download any of the available versions there to test and see if they work on your platform, just keep in mind that as the version you use becomes more outdated the signatures in use in its databases will increasingly be replaced by newer ones that can only be read and used by the engines in more current releases, so it won't be as secure as those newer versions would be (this also doesn't account for other enhancements and new features and capabilities outside of the database/core malware detection engine such as the other protection components). It isn't an ideal solution, but should at least allow you to get it up and running for now until you can find a better solution or until you migrate to a more current operating system (a good idea anyway if possible considering XP x64 met end of life several years ago and XP in general is also at end of life at this point meaning no more patches or security updates from Microsoft will be created for it). You can disable the option for Malwarebytes to check for/download new versions of the software under Settings>Application. Just disable the two options there so that you aren't offered any updates/upgrades for newer builds and you should then be able to stay on the last working version for your platform.
  8. Excellent, I'm glad it's working properly now. If there's anything else we can help you with please don't hesitate to let us know. Thanks
  9. Greetings, Please try the following to see if it resolves the issue: Download and run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Clean button, and allow it to restart your system and then reinstall Malwarebytes, either by allowing the tool to do so when it offers to on restart, or by downloading and installing the latest version from here Please let us know how it goes and if you have any further issues. Thanks
  10. You're welcome I'm not sure what the pricing would be, but Support/Sales should be able to answer that. The Support team should be able to make sure that you get the correct order and pricing according to whatever discounts/promotions they are offering.
  11. Greetings, Please contact Malwarebytes Support directly via one of the options found on this page as they will be able to assist you more promptly rather than having to await a reply from a staff member here on the forums. You should also refer to this support article if necessary to seek your refund as it includes contact information for both of the ecommerce partners that handle online sales for Malwarebytes licenses. They will be able to ensure that you get your refund and receive the appropriate pricing so that the discount you were offered is honored. Please let us know if there is anything else we might assist you with, and I'm sorry that the site was giving you trouble, but hopefully they will be able to figure out what is wrong with it and get it corrected, and I will be sure to report the issue to the team in the meantime so that they are aware of it and can investigate.
  12. The information posted by David H Lipman, while technically accurate, does not actually apply to modern threats and only indicates the capabilities and limitations within the Malware Protection/scan engine components of Malwarebytes and came from conversations years ago between David H Lipman and Bruce Harrison, one of the lead Researchers at Malwarebytes long before most of the current primary protection layers in Malwarebytes existed/had been integrated (back in the Malwarebytes Anti-Malware 1.x days). Since that time, many components have been added to Malwarebytes to account for current threats not covered by the Malware Protection component, in particular Exploit Protection which is a far more effective, signature-less and behavior based means of detecting malicious scripting behaviors and threats (since signature based detection of such attacks is not only inefficient, but completely trivial to circumvent; so much so that anyone, even I, who am not a programmer nor a malware author, could easily rewrite a script or encrypt it to bypass such detection methods; this is one of the reasons Malwarebytes chose to seek out a more effective means of stopping such attacks and integrated the Exploit Protection component to begin with). This also makes Malwarebytes far more effective against file-less malware attacks which would not be detected by signature based anti-scripting solutions. As for file infectors, they have not existed in the wild for several years now and are extremely unlikely to make a return as they are not profitable and are limited in scope to attacking Windows systems only, unlike many other more generic threat types such as exploits which have the ability to infect virtually any platform (including mobile devices/operating systems as well as Macs and even Linux as long as the targeted application/browser/plugin/extension is present on the system). With regards to hijacking and injecting malware (i.e. Trojans etc.), those too are covered by the signature-less behavior based protection in the Exploit Protection layer, and again, is far more effective because of it. I would also argue that Malwarebytes not being a "historical anti malware solution" is actually to its benefit, not a detriment because it doesn't waste resources and potentially reduce system performance by targeting threats that no longer exist and are likely to never re-emerge (in fact, to this day I've never known of a single threat that ever made a direct comeback in any form that would be detected by the historical databases used in any antivirus after it had originally disappeared from the wild, though I invite you to cite some examples if you know of any). Still, if you are not confident in Malwarebytes as the only protection for your system then you are welcome to run an antivirus alongside it (or pretty much any other security solution(s)) as Malwarebytes is designed to coexist with other protection software in real-time should the user desire to run it that way. You can also refer to the information in this FAQ entry (which incidentally, I happened to link to in the very thread/topic you referred to above in a response of my own to that very thread back then) as well as the information here to understand how Malwarebytes works as a layered defense solution to stop attacks during multiple phases of the kill chain rather than relying strictly on the limited, more reactive/less proactive (and therefore less effective) traditional signature based means of detection. Frankly, malware adapts and changes far too rapidly these days for a signature based approach to remain effective at preventing infection, and this is why others throughout the security industry, including the vast majority of AVs, have adopted methods that more closely resemble those used by Malwarebytes rather than Malwarebytes needing to adopt their more traditional signature based methods of detection. This is why you will now see signature-less, cloud, behavior, anti-exploit and similar protection layers included in many modern AVs as well as web filters/block lists, similar to the technology Malwarebytes has had for years. Today's threat landscape is made up primarily of exploits, file-less malware, PUPs (Potentially Unwanted Programs; a category where Malwarebytes has always been a leader by the way), scams (tech support scams, phishing and the like) and the occasional password stealer as well as a small handful of rootkits, all of which are targeted by one or more of the layers in Malwarebytes. There isn't a category of existing threat known that Malwarebytes is incapable of targeting with at least one if not multiple layers of the protection it provides, however if you know of any examples of any live in-the-wild threat categories/types that are not covered, you are certainly welcome to list them (and no, there aren't any file infectors in-the-wild today, though technically speaking, Malwarebytes is just as capable of detecting these as the AVs are, and the AV industry stopped trying to disinfect such threats with their primary engines long ago; this is why even top vendors like Kaspersky and Symantec among many others had to design specific separate removal tools for the most recent file infectors Sality and Virut because their primary AV engines were not capable of disinfecting files which had their code modified by these threats, and even then, disinfection was unreliable, particularly for Virut since it had a known bug where it would actually corrupt/overwrite some of the infected files' code, rendering proper functionality of the files after disinfection impossible so those files had to be replaced by clean backups or by reinstalling Windows and/or the infected program anyway).
  13. It was still blocked because those registry entries tell Windows to launch the file/program listed in those registry keys whenever the program listed on the left is launched (in this case, ASC whenever those Malwarebytes executables are run), so if the files listed no longer exist because ASC was uninstalled, it causes an error preventing the program listed on the left (Malwarebytes) from being able to run. This is actually a tactic that is also sometimes used by actual malware to enable their malicious executables to run and to try and prevent their removal, though instead of attaching themselves to programs like Malwarebytes, they will target core Windows components such as explorer.exe as well as web browsers like iexplore.exe (Internet Explorer) and even system tools such as regedit.exe and Task Manager. This ensures that the malware remains in memory on reboot and can make them difficult to remove while the system is running (this is also one of the reasons the scan engine/remediation engine in Malwarebytes uses DOR/Delete On Reboot technology to delete threats early in the boot process so that the malware doesn't have the chance to launch into memory and protect itself). I don't know why ASC added these entries for those Malwarebytes files/processes, but I'm glad you guys were able to figure it out and I'll make a note of it for future reference should an issue like this show up again. By the way, there are still issues with your Malwarebytes installation according to the latest set of logs you posted so I would suggest reinstalling Malwarebytes to ensure that it is installed properly now that it is no longer being blocked from running by those entries just to prevent any future issues.
  14. Greetings, Yes, you may safely delete the empty folder. It was likely just a trace left behind from the software you uninstalled previously. As for why Malwarebytes detects this software as PUP, please refer to the following information related to PUP detection, and in particular driver updaters and similar applications: https://www.malwarebytes.com/pup/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/malwarebytes-news/2016/10/malwarebytes-gets-tougher-on-pups/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/cybercrime/2015/06/digital-snake-oil/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/threats/registry-cleaner/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/puppum/2016/12/why-malwarebytes-detects-pc-pitstop-as-potentially-unwanted/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/malwarebytes-news/2017/11/winning-the-battle-against-pups-on-your-computer-and-in-u-s-district-court/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/puppum/2016/07/pup-friday-cleaning-up-with-5-star-awards/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/puppum/2016/08/systweak-redux-our-response/ The following links should also prove informative as to why many items are classified as PUP by Malwarebytes: https://decentsecurity.com/#/registry-cleaners/ https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2563254/microsoft-support-policy-for-the-use-of-registry-cleaning-utilities https://www.howtogeek.com/171633/why-using-a-registry-cleaner-wont-speed-up-your-pc-or-fix-crashes/ https://www.howtogeek.com/162683/pc-cleaning-apps-are-a-scam-heres-why-and-how-to-speed-up-your-pc/ https://lifehacker.com/5482701/whats-the-registry-should-i-clean-it-and-whats-the-point https://lifehacker.com/5033518/debunking-common-windows-performance-tweaking-myths https://www.howtogeek.com/198758/never-download-a-driver-updating-utility-theyre-worse-than-useless/ https://www.howtogeek.com/233115/the-only-way-to-safely-update-your-hardware-drivers-on-windows/ http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1857635/good-free-automatic-driver-updater.html http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1974868/trusted-driver-updater.html https://www.howtogeek.com/172839/10-types-of-system-tools-and-optimization-programs-you-dont-need-on-windows/ https://computer.howstuffworks.com/question1751.htm https://lifehacker.com/5415355/do-you-really-need-more-than-4gb-of-ram https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/memory-module-upgrade,2264.html https://www.howtogeek.com/128130/htg-explains-why-its-good-that-your-computers-ram-is-full/ https://techlogon.com/2011/03/28/will-more-ram-memory-make-my-computer-faster/
  15. Excellent, I'm glad that it helped you. If there's anything else we might assist you with please let us know. Thanks
  16. Greetings, If Malwarebytes is no longer on your system then it could be a known issue with the installer which occurs sometimes during program version upgrades/updates. Generally you should be able to resolve it whenever it happens by reinstalling the latest version from here. Please let us know if this corrects the issue or not and if you have any further trouble. Thanks
  17. Greetings, It could be an issue with Windows Security Center/Action Center. Please open Malwarebytes and navigate to Settings>Application and locate the Windows Action Center section and set it to Never register Malwarebytes in the Windows Action Center and then restart your system and see if the issue is resolved. If not, then please try performing a clean installation to see if that eliminates the issue: Download and run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Clean button, and allow it to restart your system and then reinstall Malwarebytes, either by allowing the tool to do so when it offers to on restart, or by downloading and installing the latest version from here Please let us know how it goes and if the issue persists. Thanks
  18. Greetings, There seems to be an issue with one of the recent builds of Malwarebytes causing this behavior. It is usually fixed by performing a clean reinstall so please try the following to see if it corrects the issue: Download and run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Clean button, and allow it to restart your system and then reinstall Malwarebytes, either by allowing the tool to do so when it offers to on restart, or by downloading and installing the latest version from here Please let us know how it goes. Thanks
  19. Greetings, Please do the following and let us know if it corrects the issue or not: Download and run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Clean button, and allow it to restart your system and then reinstall Malwarebytes, either by allowing the tool to do so when it offers to on restart, or by downloading and installing the latest version from here If you require your license key you may try logging into My.Malwarebytes.com and you should be able to manage your licenses there. If you are unable to do so or aren't able to retrieve your license key there then please contact Malwarebytes Support directly via one of the options found on this page and they will assist you and should be able to retrieve your license key for you. Please let us know how it goes and if there's anything else we might assist you with. Thanks
  20. Greetings, The Premium version of Malwarebytes is an antivirus replacement, meaning that if you have the paid version with real-time protection then you don't have to run an antivirus, however this is not true of the free version so if you're only using the free version of Malwarebytes then you do still need an antivirus. Malwarebytes purchased Windows Firewall Control formerly by Binisoft. It is now available for free here and may be used with Malwarebytes Premium or with any other antivirus if you like. Malwarebytes does not create performance boosters or junk cleaners for a couple of reasons. First, many of these types of applications are basically nothing but snake oil and don't actually impact system performance, especially in any positive way (i.e. they don't make systems run faster, and sometimes do more harm than good). As for junk file cleaners, there are plenty of free tools that serve this purpose already such as TFC and CCleaner so Malwarebytes focuses on killing malware rather than applications that aren't related to security. Malwarebytes often detects many PC performance booster applications as PUP (Potentially Unwanted Programs). You can find out more about why at the following links: https://www.malwarebytes.com/pup/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/malwarebytes-news/2016/10/malwarebytes-gets-tougher-on-pups/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/cybercrime/2015/06/digital-snake-oil/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/threats/registry-cleaner/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/puppum/2016/12/why-malwarebytes-detects-pc-pitstop-as-potentially-unwanted/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/malwarebytes-news/2017/11/winning-the-battle-against-pups-on-your-computer-and-in-u-s-district-court/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/puppum/2016/07/pup-friday-cleaning-up-with-5-star-awards/ https://blog.malwarebytes.com/puppum/2016/08/systweak-redux-our-response/ The following links should also prove informative as to why many of these types of items are classified as PUP by Malwarebytes: https://decentsecurity.com/#/registry-cleaners/ https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2563254/microsoft-support-policy-for-the-use-of-registry-cleaning-utilities https://www.howtogeek.com/171633/why-using-a-registry-cleaner-wont-speed-up-your-pc-or-fix-crashes/ https://www.howtogeek.com/162683/pc-cleaning-apps-are-a-scam-heres-why-and-how-to-speed-up-your-pc/ https://lifehacker.com/5482701/whats-the-registry-should-i-clean-it-and-whats-the-point https://lifehacker.com/5033518/debunking-common-windows-performance-tweaking-myths https://www.howtogeek.com/198758/never-download-a-driver-updating-utility-theyre-worse-than-useless/ https://www.howtogeek.com/233115/the-only-way-to-safely-update-your-hardware-drivers-on-windows/ http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1857635/good-free-automatic-driver-updater.html http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1974868/trusted-driver-updater.html https://www.howtogeek.com/172839/10-types-of-system-tools-and-optimization-programs-you-dont-need-on-windows/ https://computer.howstuffworks.com/question1751.htm https://lifehacker.com/5415355/do-you-really-need-more-than-4gb-of-ram https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/memory-module-upgrade,2264.html https://www.howtogeek.com/128130/htg-explains-why-its-good-that-your-computers-ram-is-full/ https://techlogon.com/2011/03/28/will-more-ram-memory-make-my-computer-faster/
  21. Nice catch, thanks for the assist @dcollins Hopefully that corrects this issue once and for all.
  22. In LockHunter if you click on the Other... button at the bottom and select Delete At Next System Restart hopefully that will get rid of it. If not, then give it a try in Safe Mode to see if that works. If you still can't get rid of the file, then I'd suggest following the instructions in this topic and creating a new thread in the malware removal area by clicking here and one of our malware removal specialists will assist you. They have access to additional tools and resources that aren't used in the other areas of the forums and I'm sure they'll have something that can eliminate the file for you if all else fails.
  23. Your logs show entries for Avira, AVG and Kaspersky. That could be the issue as having more than one AV on the system could create conflicts and other issues. Try removing the ones you don't wish to keep, then reboot, then try reinstalling Malwarebytes by following the instructions below: Download and run the Malwarebytes Support Tool Accept the EULA and click Advanced tab on the left (not Start Repair) Click the Clean button, and allow it to restart your system and then reinstall Malwarebytes, either by allowing the tool to do so when it offers to on restart, or by downloading and installing the latest version from here Hopefully it will be able to install its drivers and services now. Please let us know how it goes. Thanks
  24. I'd suggest trying the delete on reboot option if you haven't already. That method usually works in most cases when others fail (and it's what Malwarebytes uses in its malware removal engine and has for many years, pretty much since the beginning because it's so effective against difficult to remove files).
  25. @jlans89 have you heard back from Research on this issue yet? Please provide a status update if you are able to. Thanks
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