Jump to content

clc

Members
  • Posts

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

0 Neutral
  1. Please disregard, David already answered this: " ... I could only create an exception by pointing to a file, as opposed to naming and there is not ability to wildcard, as needed by PrivateInternetAccess. . ."
  2. Please provide an option for both manual and scheduled scans to limit CPU usage to a certain percent. I have a highly overclocked notebook (manufacture OC'd to 4.4) that I use for my biz, and it can heat up with a long scan. Microsoft Security Essentials allows me to set the CPU usage to a level that doesn't overly heat up my processor in their scheduled scan options (although not so with manual scans). Thanks for your help, Curtis
  3. Please allow the user to add program exceptions by explicit name and use of wild cards as laid out by PrivateInternetAccess. In Malwarbytes, I could only create an exception by pointing to a file, as opposed to naming and there is not ability to wildcard, as needed by PrivateInternetAccess. I noticed Malwarbytes was blocking Rubyw internet access, and didn't know why . . . so I did some research and here is what I found: Rubyw.exe and variants thereof are created by PrivateInternetAccess. I use PrivateInternetAccess. Here is their explanation: "To further follow-up on our last reply to you, what your program is detecting is called rubyw.exe. This is the process that executes all the ruby scripting in our application, that allows it to run. However, we designed it to install to a randomized temporary directory on each launch, along with a randomized filename, to ensure no one can locate it, and thus crack it (while it's running, it contains your login information and binds your local IP, which would be a major security risk if it became visible externally; thus why we randomize it's name and location, so it can't be found by automatic scripts/etc). However, this randomization causes security software to be unable to recognize it. Security software operates off of a predefined list of allowed apps, called a definition file. If it sees anything that's not on that list (even custom apps like ours), it will state it's untrusted it, and immediately assumes it's not safe (since it doesn't know what it is). This is extremely common, and is why the app developers allow you a way to add your own exceptions for apps on your computer, to allow them to function when you know they're safe. To do this for our app, you need to add the following process exceptions to it's whitelist/allowed app list/etc, which should keep it from interfering with it's operation in the future: rubyw.exe ruby*.exe ruby*.* */ruby*.* */*ruby*.* ../ruby*.* ../*ruby*.* . . . . https://www.privatei...tup-question/p1 Hence the need for this request. Thank you, Curtis
  4. Thanks David for how to do the individual folder scan! Also, thanks for the tip on where to put feature requests, as a newbie to the forum, the direction is much appreciated. Curtis
  5. Hi, It appears that the manual scan that allows me to select a HDD to scan, only provides a checkbox of an entire HDD, rather than allowing me to select only a subfolder(s) to scan. I download items to a specific HDD that is loaded up with other stuff, and when I want to scan the new downloads, I don't want to have to scan the entire HDD. For a perfect implementation of this feature, please see how Security Essentials allows manual scans of specific file folders on a HDD. Thank you, Curtis
  6. Hi, New member/paid user of Malwarbytes Consumer version. I noticed Malwarbytes was blocking Rubyw internet access, and didn't know why . . . so I did some research and here is what I found: Rubyw.exe and variants thereof are created by PrivateInternetAccess. I use PrivateInternetAccess. Here is their explanation: "To further follow-up on our last reply to you, what your program is detecting is called rubyw.exe. This is the process that executes all the ruby scripting in our application, that allows it to run. However, we designed it to install to a randomized temporary directory on each launch, along with a randomized filename, to ensure no one can locate it, and thus crack it (while it's running, it contains your login information and binds your local IP, which would be a major security risk if it became visible externally; thus why we randomize it's name and location, so it can't be found by automatic scripts/etc). However, this randomization causes security software to be unable to recognize it. Security software operates off of a predefined list of allowed apps, called a definition file. If it sees anything that's not on that list (even custom apps like ours), it will state it's untrusted it, and immediately assumes it's not safe (since it doesn't know what it is). This is extremely common, and is why the app developers allow you a way to add your own exceptions for apps on your computer, to allow them to function when you know they're safe. To do this for our app, you need to add the following process exceptions to it's whitelist/allowed app list/etc, which should keep it from interfering with it's operation in the future: rubyw.exe ruby*.exe ruby*.* */ruby*.* */*ruby*.* ../ruby*.* ../*ruby*.* . . . . https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/forum/index.php?p=/discussion/970/pia-client-setup-question/p1 Feature request for Malwarbytes. Please allow the user to add program exceptions by explicit name and use of wild cards as laid out by PrivateInternetAccess. In Malwarbytes, I could only create an exception by pointing to a file, as opposed to naming and there is not ability to wildcard, as needed by PrivateInternetAccess. Thanks, Curtis
Back to top
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

This site uses cookies - We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.